Chapter XVIII "EVEN TO CAPE HORN"

ONLY a few final preparations now, and he would be ready to set out upon that fantastic enterprise which had been simmering in his mind for so long.

Méndez had sent a shipment of 10,000 rifles and large quantities of munitions, and five armed war sloops had arrived from England to reinforce the squadron of Brión. Angostura, then, and the river would be well protected from enemy attack.

The attitude of foreign governments was beginning to favor the patriot cause; it was necessary to accomplish a spectacular maneuver quickly for effect. On March 28, 1818, Henry Clay had made an impassioned plea before the United States Congress for recognition of the South American states. The proposition was voted down, but considerable sympathy had been aroused; Clay was continuing his efforts and winning support.

Considerable numbers of the foreign legionnaires had arrived by this time--commissioned and noncommissioned officers mostly--and Bolívar had reorganized them, preserving somewhat their original units, though these consisted of little more than a cadre of officers for each. After the departure of Hippisley Colonel Rooke was placed at the head of the whole British Legion and of the First Rifles as his individual command. It was necessary to fill the ranks with native troops.

In the interior of Guayana, up the Caroní River, were those Indian missions which had been established by the Capuchin monks and which Piar had seized, needlessly

-208-

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Man of Glory: Simon Bolivar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • I: Guapo 1
  • Chapter I PolvorÍn 3
  • Chapter III an Oath in Rome 19
  • Chapter IV the Powder Keg Explodes 35
  • Chapter V the Precursor 45
  • Chapter VI the Red Cap 51
  • Chapter VII "Even Nature Opposes" 58
  • Ii: Paladin 67
  • Chapter VIII "BlessÉ Au CŒur" 69
  • Chapter IX Glory is Born 81
  • Chapter X War to the Death 92
  • Chapter XI a Gilded Chariot 106
  • Interlude a Contradiction--Liberator and Dictator 109
  • Iii: Prophet in His Own Land 117
  • Chapter XII the Infernal Legion 119
  • Chapter XIII Hussars from Spain 134
  • Chapter XIV Jamaica Letter 144
  • Interlude HombrÍa 152
  • Iv: Path of Glory 163
  • Chapter XV the Centaur 165
  • Chapter XVI Red Coats in Guayana 180
  • Chapter XVII the BolÍvar Constitution 195
  • Chapter XVIII "Even to Cape Horn" 208
  • Chapter XIX BoyacÁ-New Granada Liberated 219
  • Chapter XX the Colombian Union 228
  • Chapter XXI Carabobo -- Venezuela Liberated 237
  • Chapter XXII the Path Leads Southward 249
  • Chapter XXIII Pichincha -- Quito Liberated 258
  • Chapter XXIV the Land of the Incas 274
  • Chapter XXV Ayacucho--PerÚ Liberated 287
  • Interlude an Amazon and Jeweled Wreaths 296
  • V: Laurels, Not a Crown 307
  • Chapter XXVI the Pinnacle 309
  • Chapter XXVII "Everything for Glory" 320
  • Chapter XXVIII the Path Leads Downward 332
  • Postlude the Path Ends 346
  • Chapter XXIX "The Great Gentleman of Colombia" 353
  • Author's Note 361
  • Acknowledgments 367
  • Bibliography 369
  • Index 379
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