The Periodicals of American Transcendentalism

By Clarence L. F. Gohdes | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The present volume undertakes a study of the periodicals which were conducted or controlled by people who were known in their day as transcendentalists. An exception is the last chapter, dealing with The Index, a journal which throws so much light upon the later history of transcendentalism that the writer felt that it should not be omitted from his study.

This book does not presume to be a general treatise on transcendentalism, and it takes for granted a knowledge of such investigations as have been made by O. B. Frothingham and H. C. Goddard.

In making the present study the writer has profited by the assistance and suggestions of a number of gentlemen to whom he would express his gratitude: Professors K. B. Murdock and Bliss Perry, of Harvard University; J. B. Hubbell, of Duke University; and A. H. Thorndike, H. Schneider, E. E. Neff, and R. L. Rusk, of Columbia University. For his generous aid and kindly direction the author owes an especial debt to Professor Rusk, under whose supervision this work was written as a Columbia doctoral dissertation.

The chapter dealing with "The Western Messenger and The Dial" is reprinted with few changes from Studies in Philology for January, 1929.

CLARENCE GOHDES

Duke University April, 1931

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Periodicals of American Transcendentalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I Introduction 3
  • Chapter II the Western Messenger and the Dial 17
  • Chapter III Orestes A. Brownson and the Boston Quarterly Review 38
  • Chapter IV the Present 83
  • Chapter V the Harbinger 101
  • Chapter VI the Spirit of the Age 132
  • Chapter VII Elizabeth Peabody and Her Æsthetic Papers 143
  • Chapter VIII the Massachusetts Quarterly Review 157
  • Chapter IX the Dial (cincinnati) 194
  • Chapter X the Radical 210
  • Chapter XI 229
  • Appendix Two Uncollected Emerson Items 255
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.