The Diaries of John Bright

By John Bright; R. A. J. Walling | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII THE STRUGGLE WITH PALMERSTON

1

ALTHOUGH at the turn of the century Bright, in the full vigour of early middle-age, had become a shining figure in the nation, his noblest speeches were yet unborn and his finest work still to do. In the great campaign for Free Trade he spoke continuously, ardently, with ingenuity, force and freedom; but the conditions of that busy, hurried survey of three kingdoms and his sense of the urgency of a single question made for argumentative agility rather than for philosophic weight. The year 1850 marked the beginning of the harvest he had tilled in long brooding over the moral philosophy of politics, the possibility of the democratic government of a State on the basis of Christian ethics, the question of peace and war, the foundations of human freedom, the relation of nationality to political morality, the conditions of citizenship, the limits of toleration.

Bright never made a successful Minister. One chief reason why has been suggested--that he had no genius for detail and no industry in routine. There are, however, conspicuous examples of politicians, more impatient of detail and less tolerant of routine than he, who have succeeded in the highest offices of State. The likelier reason, as it will probably seem to readers of his Diaries, is that he referred every question of policy or of political conduct to first principles. "He is to be feared who fears the gods." To Bright more than to most mortals, Conscience was a god whom in the last resort he could not disobey. A conscience trained in the quiet of the Quaker spirit and nourished by the Inner Light was a greater force than ambition, fame, popularity or applause. It guided his conduct in fair weather and foul. To it he referred the decision of every crisis of his life. It gave him his authority with his fellow-countrymen and his importance in Parliament. To it he owed the singular impressiveness, the truly heroic magnitude, which he attained in the fierce contest with Palmerston and all that

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Diaries of John Bright
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 594

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.