The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English

By Ian Hamilton | Go to book overview

T

TAGGARD, Genevieve ( 1894-1943), was born in Waitsburg, Washington, to teacher parents who took her to Hawaii to live when she was 2. Due to her father's lung problems the family shifted back and forth several times before 1914, when Taggard entered Berkeley, where she was encouraged in her writing by Witter*Bynner. In 1920 she moved to Manhattan, worked for an avant-garde publisher, and helped found Measure: A Magazine of Verse a year later, the same year she married novelist Robert Wolf.

The marriage was marred by several clashes before its dissolution in 1934. Taggard's poetry, first gathered in For Eager Lovers ( 1922), Hawaiian Hilltop ( 1923), and Travelling Standing Still ( 1928), was highly polished, occasionally touching, backed by sure erudition, as was her study, The Life and Mind of Emily Dickinson ( 1930). She also taught at Mount Holyoke and Sarah Lawrence. Her taste for the metaphysical vied with an equally intense commitment to leftist politics, evident in the protest poetry of Calling Western Union ( 1936), and her editing both May Days: An Anthology of Verse from Masses-Liberator ( 1925) and Circumference, Varieties of Metaphysical Verse, 1456-1928 ( 1929). She married an American representative of Tass in 1935. Her last volumes, Long View ( 1942) and Slow Music ( 1946) returned to a metaphysical mode.

Her daughter, Marcia D. Liles, has edited To the Natural World ( Boise, Idaho, 1980), a generous selection of her work with bibliographical notes.

[ EB

TAMBIMUTTU See POETRY LONDON.

TATE, Allen ( 1899-1979), was born in Winchester, Kentucky. At Vanderbilt University he joined John Crowe *Ransom's literary discussion group (his friend Robert Penn *Warren was also a member), and co-founded and edited its journal, The *Fugitive, thus beginning a lasting alliance with the *Agrarian group of Southern writers. In 1924 he married the novelist Caroline Gordon, and over the next ten years, living variously in West Virginia, New York, Paris, and Tennessee, published biographies of Stonewall Jackson ( 1928) and Jefferson Davis ( 1929), and made his name as a poet with Mr. Pope and Other Poem ( 1928), Three Poems ( 1930), and Poems, 1928-31 ( 1932). During the 1930s he took up his first teaching post, in Tennessee ( 1934-6), and published his first book of criticism, Reactionary Essays on Poetry and Ideas ( 1936); like much of his poetry, his only novel, The Fathers ( 1938), set in antebellum Virginia, is an attempt to understand his regional and cultural origins. Tate was poet-in-residence at Princeton in the early 1940s. Then, as editor of the Sewanee Review ( 1944-6), he encouraged and influenced writing on Old Southern and New Critical issues alike. His version of *New Criticism, most forcefully defended and practised in Reasm in Madness ( 1941) and On the Limits of Poetry ( 1948), holds that poetry is not a vehicle for imprecise feeling but an autonomous structure, an objective frame for a tension between themes. His commentaries, however, are usually as alert to a poem's intellectual, cultural, and biographical context as to its formal qualities. From 1951 Tate was professor of English at the University of Minnesota, making frequent trips elsewhere to lecture, and continuing to publish volumes of well crafted poems: Poems ( New York, 1960), The Swimmers ( London, 1970;

-533-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Selection of Anthologies xi
  • Key to Contributors xiv
  • Alphabetical List of Contributors xvii
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 80
  • D 113
  • E 143
  • F 156
  • G 179
  • H 206
  • I 247
  • J 251
  • K 266
  • L 284
  • M 318
  • N 375
  • O 393
  • P 407
  • Q 436
  • R 437
  • S 468
  • T 533
  • U 555
  • V 557
  • W 562
  • Y 593
  • Z 599
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 606

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.