The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English

By Ian Hamilton | Go to book overview

U

University of Queensland Press. Under Frank Thompson, UQP in the late 1960s began a major series of Australian poetry tides, beginning with Roger *McDonald Citizens of the Mist ( 1968) and the anthology New Impulses its Australian Poetry, ed. R. Hall and T. Shapcott ( 1968). UQP appointed Roger McDonald as poetry editor. As the result of a suggestion by David *Malouf in 1970, Paperback Poets began. This was to feature virtually all the outstanding writers who emerged over the next decade: Malouf, Michael *Dransfield, Judith *Rodriguez, Rhyll *McMaster, Andrew *Taylor, Geoff *Page, Robert *Gray, Alan *Wearne, Jennifer *Maiden, and others. The series also published already established writers ( Bruce *Beaver, Rodney *Hall, Thomas *Shapcott, R. A. *Simpson). The First Paperback Poets Anthology, ed. R. McDonald, was published in 1974 and the second (ed. T. Shapcott) in 1982. Thirty-seven poets appeared in this series alone. Subsequently UQP continued with poetry, though in a more formal format. Many titles published in the 1980s were awarded major literary prizes. After the success of the Paperback Poets series UQP embarked on fiction publication by new writers, beginning with Rodney Hall, Peter Carey, and David Malouf, and this has become a major feature of contemporary Australian literature. Poetry, however, provided the impetus for UQP to become one of Australia's major publishers.

[ TWS

UNTERMEYER. Louis ( 1885-1978), was born in New York. As a famous and at one time influential anthologist Untermeyer attracted praise from Allen *Tate (his anthologies of American poetry were the 'best available') and rude dispraise from E. E. *Cummings ('Mr u will not be missed | who as an anthologist | sold the many on the few | not excluding mr u'). Tate was right about the quality of the anthologies: as works for the general reader they are admirably eclectic, and they give useful representative selections from interesting poets otherwise difficult of access. Untermeyer's knowledge of modern poetry was extensive. The best of his own poetry consists of enjoyably sharp parodies ( Collected Parodies, New York, 1926), in which poets such as * Yeats, Poe, Vachel *Lindsay, and * Masefield tell Mother Goose tales: their excesses as well as virtues are amusingly brought out. The rest of his poetic output, which is competent, is most of all influenced by Heine, of whose poems he made many translations. It is pallid, since he seemed to need the parody form to bring out his undoubted wit. But Edwin *Muir praised his 'opulence'. From Another World ( New York, 1939), is valuable for its anecdotes of the large number of poets he knew. See Selected Poems and Parodies ( New York, 1935) and Long Feud: Selected Poems ( New York. 1962). [ MS-S

URDANG, Constance ( 1922- ), was born in New York City. She graduated from Smith College and the University of Iowa. Married to the poet Donald *Finkel, she now divides her time between St Louis, Missouri (her home for many years) and San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

All three geographical locations figure in her first works of fiction, Natural History ( 1988), Lucha ( 1986), and American Earthquakes ( 1988) and her recent novellas, The Woman who Read Novels and

-555-

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The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry in English
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Selection of Anthologies xi
  • Key to Contributors xiv
  • Alphabetical List of Contributors xvii
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 80
  • D 113
  • E 143
  • F 156
  • G 179
  • H 206
  • I 247
  • J 251
  • K 266
  • L 284
  • M 318
  • N 375
  • O 393
  • P 407
  • Q 436
  • R 437
  • S 468
  • T 533
  • U 555
  • V 557
  • W 562
  • Y 593
  • Z 599
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