The Oxford Companion to Irish History

By S. J. Connolly | Go to book overview

Note to the Reader
THE organizing principle of the volume is an alphabetical listing of headwords. These include personal and family names, events, institutions and movements, titles of books or other literary works, contemporary slogans and catch phrases, as well as modern terms that reflect the preoccupations and debates of historians. The Subject Index offers an analytical guide to the volume, in the form of a fist of the most important headwords, grouped by category. Readers who would like to orient themselves with a brief chronological narrative may wish to turn to Professor Kearney's entry on 'England'--a suggestion that itself is testimony to some of the contradictions built into Ireland's history.Cross-referencing, indicated by an asterisk (*), has been guided as far as possible by common sense. This means that in some cases asterisks have been added to what are in fact slight variants of the actual headword (e.g. '*Celtic' where the headword is 'Celts'). It also means that cross-references have been inserted where they seem most likely to assist the reader, rather than mechanically wherever a headword occurs in the text. Thus, for example, we have not asterisked every reference to Dublin, to the army, or to women.Irish personal names (see 'surnames') have a complex history, which has presented a number of problems in terms of the arrangement of entries. Readers should note the following:
i. Names in 'Mc' and 'Mac' are ordered as if spelled 'Mac' and grouped together before other headwords beginning with 'M'.
ii. However, it should be noted that surnames began to be used only in the eleventh century. Before then 'A mac B' (distinguished by lower-case 'mac') meant that A was literally the son of B. Biographical entries from this period are grouped under Christian name: thus Áedán mac Gabráin appears under 'A', not 'Mac'.
iii. For similar reasons early English (or 'Norman', though see the entry on this label) names are written with lower-case 'f' for 'fitz'. But these are nevertheless, following the usual convention, listed under 'F'.
iv. Names beginning with 'de' are ordered according to the main part of the name, for example de Lacy under 'L', de Valera under 'V'.

For the period up to 1169 personal names are given in the Irish form, with anglicized versions in brackets. Thereafter they are given in the anglicized form, with Gaelic versions, where necessary, in brackets. Those whose careers straddle that borderline have had to be allocated to one side or the other: thus 'Diarmait Mac Murchada (Dermot MacMurrough)', but 'Rory O'Connor (Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair)'.

Place names have been given in their contemporary form, with modern equivalents supplied where appropriate, for example 'King's Country (Offaly)'. Following a commonly adopted compromise, we refer to the city of Derry and the county of Londonderry.

The bibliographies attached to longer entries are necessarily selective. Preference has

-xvii-

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The Oxford Companion to Irish History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Advisers ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contributors xiii
  • Note to the Reader xvii
  • A 1
  • B 33
  • C 66
  • D 133
  • E 167
  • F 183
  • G 212
  • H 233
  • I 254
  • K 282
  • L 292
  • M 333
  • N 377
  • O 397
  • P 424
  • Q 469
  • R 471
  • S 495
  • T 532
  • U 557
  • V 577
  • W 582
  • Y 601
  • Z 603
  • Maps 605
  • Subject Index 613
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