A Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Art

By Ian Chilvers | Go to book overview

M

MA. See ACTIVISTS.

McAllister, Isabel. See GILBERT, SIR ALFRED.

McAlpine, Alistair. See NEW GENERATION.

McBride, Henry (1867-1962). American art critic, born at West Chester, Pennsylvania. He worked as a writer and illustrator of seed catalogues before he saved enough money to move to New York in 1889. After studying at the * Art Students League and elsewhere, he taught at various schools and gained a wide experience of art through travels in Europe. In 1913 he began working for the New York Sun and--at the age of 46--at last found his vocation in 'art criticism of a dry, subhumorous, and subtle sort' ( Dictionary of American Biography). Some of his first articles (unsigned) were on the * Armory Show ( 1913) and they were among the most moderate and informative devoted to the exhibition. McBride continued writing for the Sun until 1950 and also contributed criticism to The Dial, which during the 1920s (it ceased publication in 1929) was 'the most distinguished literary monthly in the US to champion modern artistic movements' ( Oxford Companion to American Literature). From 1930 to 1932 he was editor of Creative Art, which was initially published as a supplement to the American edition of the London-based *Studio. When the Sun merged with the World Telegram in 1950, it dispensed with the services of McBride (now in his 80s), but he was taken on by * Art News, for which he wrote a regular column, 1950-5. He 'endured old age philosophically' and 'died the undisputed dean of American art critics' ( Dictionary of American Biography).

McBride was a much liked man who had many friends in the art world; he even got on tolerably well with the quarrelsome Dr * Barnes. His sympathies were wide (at the end of his career he was writing perceptively about such rising stars as * Pollock and * Rothko) and his literary style was relaxed and unpretentious. A collection of his articles was published in 1975 as "The Flow of Art: Essays and Criticisms of Henry McBride".

MacBryde, Robert (1913-66). British painter and theatre designer, born at Maybole, Ayrshire. After working for five years as an engineer in a factory he studied at * Glasgow School of Art, 1932-7. He formed an inseparable relationship with his fellow student Robert *Colquhoun and they lived and worked together until the latter's death in 1962. MacBryde himself consistently maintained that Colquhoun was the dominant figure artistically, and his work (mainly still-lifes and figure subjects) has been overshadowed by that of his partner. Colquhoun was certainly the more imaginative, but some critics maintain that MacBryde had a better sense of colour.

McCahon, Colin (1919-87). New Zealand painter. With Rita *Angus and Toss *Woollaston, McCahon formed 'the trinity of native- born painters who pioneered the modern movement in New Zealand art' ( Gil Docking, Two Hundred Years of New Zealand Painting, 1971) and he is generally considered his country's foremost 20th-century artist. He was born in Timaru, studied at Dunedin School of Fine Arts, and 'roamed the length of New Zealand' ( Docking). His paintings--intense and visionary in style--are mainly landscapes and religious subjects, and he often combined the two, as in his Stations of the Cross series, in which Christ's Passion is placed in the North Otago hills. In 1953 McCahon was appointed keeper of the Auckland City Art Gallery and in 1964 he became lecturer in painting at the University of Auckland.

Macció, Rómulo. See OTRA FIGURACIÓN.

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