Migrant Workers in International Human Rights Law: Their Protection in Countries of Employment

By Ryszard Cholewinski | Go to book overview
Save to active project

I International Migration for Employment: An Overview with Reference to the Right to Development

[A]nthropologically-speaking, migration is an irrepressible human urge. People have always wanted to move to places with more spiritual freedom, greater political liberty or higher standards of living (and the satisfaction of basic needs in their country of origin does not constitute a threshold at which the urge to migrate suddenly vanishes or loses legitimacy). The more tolerant the receiving State, the more attractive its spiritual freedom and political liberty; the richer it is, the stronger its economic pull. When tolerance and wealth go hand in hand, man-made laws can attempt to regulate migration but they cannot suppress it . . . Economically-speaking, migration represents for the individual an escape from poverty (relative or absolute) and it relieves his home country of mouths to feed and bodies to clothe and shelter--even if it does not necessarily boost its productive capacity or afford it other gains as it does the individual and the country of employment.1

These are fascinating and extraordinary times, but also precarious and unpredictable. Since 1989, there have been many political changes, particularly in Europe. With the collapse of the Berlin Wall, the great ideological barrier between East and West has been swept aside. In its place, uncertainty reigns. Many states have regained their political freedom after a long period of oppression. Many more have entered the arena of international affairs for the very first time. War has raged in the heart of Europe--in the newly independent states of the former Yugoslavia and especially in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Conflict and unrest have spread to many corners of what was once the Soviet Union, where nations and peoples have sought to assert themselves after a long dark period of totalitarian rule. In Africa, genocidal atrocities, on an unprecedented scale, have been committed in Rwanda. These recent events, as is often the case, have eclipsed those unchanging concerns which have constantly preoccupied the international community, such as the scourge of poverty and the continuing and widening economic divide between the poor developing countries of the South and the prosperous developed nations of the North.

In this transitional and uncertain world order, the migration of people, both involuntary and voluntary, remains a familiar and perennial concern. From the earliest times, people have migrated across frontiers for numerous and various

____________________
1
W. R. Böhning, Studies in International Labour Migration ( London: ILO (published by Macmillan Press), 1984) Ch. 1, "'International Migration and the International Economic Order'" 3, 13.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Migrant Workers in International Human Rights Law: Their Protection in Countries of Employment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.