Journey to the Centre of the Earth

By Jules Verne; William Butcher | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
Verne as Seen by the Critics
1. 'We have the good fortune to have to draw to our readers' attention a new and charming book by M. Jules Verne. The [sic] Journey to the Centre of the Earth, like Five Weeks in a Balloon and The British at the North Pole [original title of the first volume of Captain Hatteras], combines the most solid scientific qualities with the amusement and interest of a drama and a tale. Young people and people in society will not find a more agreeable and excellent guide than M. Verne to initiate them to geological discoveries and to the mysterious and so little known history of the Earth's massif on which we live' (Stahl [pseudonym of Hetzel:]: publicity announcement in the Magasin d'éducation et de récréation, 1866).
2. 'This fictional journey has all the colours and movement of reality; and if the author had not taken the care to tell us himself, the illusion would be almost too complete. M. Jules Verne is a true scientist, a delightful story-teller, and a writer of the greatest merit' ( Gustave Landol, 1864).
3. ' Journey to the Centre of the Earth is phantasmagoric; but the reader is so caught up in Axel's anguish . . . that the improbability of the events takes on secondary importance . . . Interior and exterior adventures are so closely interwoven that it is not until Axel has completed his final test that we emerge from the fiction and begin to wonder where the truth of the matter was . . . One feels that the book was Verne's escape . . . into the world of dream, one that he was never to undertake again on this scale' ( Jean Jules-Verne, 1973, trans. by Roger Greaves ).
4. 'Lidenbrock conveys a new vision of space. What distinguishes two points now is how close or how far they are from the centre . . . The corresponding map is a half-line, where points situated at the same distance are indistinguishable. This accounts for Lidenbrock's behaviour, "the man of the perpendiculars", whose only wish is to "slide down the Earth's radius", and for whom the worst torture is to have to navigate on that interior sea that we find so magnificent' ( Dominique Lacaze, 1979).

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Journey to the Centre of the Earth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Translation xxx
  • Select Bibliography xxxiii
  • A Chronology of Jules Verne xxxv
  • Journey to the Centre of the Earth 1
  • Explanatory Notes 219
  • Appendix Verne as Seen by the Critics 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.