Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions

By Elizabeth Boa | Go to book overview

Bibliography

EDITIONS AND TRANSLATIONS OF KAFKA'S WORKS

References are given for both German and English sources as indicated by the initials listed on the List of Abbreviations (pp. ix-x). English translations of Kafka's texts have on occasion been silently emended. All other translations are by me unless otherwise indicated.


Letters and Diaries

Briefe an Felice und andere Korrespondenz aus der Verlobungszeit, ed. Erich Heller and Jüirgen Born ( Frankfurt am Main, 1976). ET: Letters to Felice, ed. Erich Heller and Jüirgen Born, trans. James Stern and Elizabeth Duckworth (Harmondsworth, 1983), with Elias Canetti, Kafka's Other Trial, trans. Christopher Middleton.

Briefe an Milena, ed. Jüirgen Born and Michael Müller ( Frankfurt am Main, 1986). ET: Letters to Milena, ed. Willy Haas, trans. Tania and James Stern (Harmondsworth, 1983).

Briefe an Ottla und die Familie, ed. Hartmut Binder and Klaus Wagenbach ( Frankfurt am Main, 1981). ET: Letters to Ottla & the Family, , ed. N. N. Glatzer, trans. Richard and Clara Winston ( New York, 1982).

Briefe 1902-1924: Gesammelte Werke in Einzelbänden, ed. Max Brod ( Frankfurt am Main, 1966). ET: Letters to Friends, Family and Editors, trans. Richard and Clara Winston ( London., 1978).

Tagebücber in der Fassung der Handscbrift, ed. Hans-Gerd Kock, Michael Müller, and Malcolm Pasley ( Frankfurt am Main, 1990). ET: The Diaries of Franz Kafka 1910-1923, ed. Max Brod (Harmondsworth, 1972).


Stories and Sketches

Drucke zu Lebzeiten, ed. Hans-Gerd Koch, Wolf Kittler, and Gerhard Neumann ( Frankfurt am Main, 1994).

Nachgelassene Schriften und Fragmente in der Fassung der Handschrift, 2 vols., ed. Malcolm Pasley ( Frankfurt am Main, 1993).

The Collected Short Stories of Franz Kafka, ed. Nahum N. Glatzer (Harmondsworth, 1988).

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