Preface to the second edition

The reception history of great composers, and especially that of Schubert, is best thought of as a gradual process of discovery, as a full and complete disclosure of the range of the composer's genius. Hence the importance of complete editions and performances. This was recognized even in the nineteenth century by the missionary work of such Schubert enthusiasts as Charles Hallé, who in 1868 played all the eleven then available piano sonatas of Schubert in a series of London recitals; and August Manns, the conductor of the Crystal Palace Orchestra, who in 1881 performed all eight symphonies in chronological order. Manns followed this up two years later by performing the E major symphonic sketch of 1821 in John Barnett completed orchestration. The same urge to present Schubert whole and complete must have inspired Nicolaus Dumba and Eusebius Mandyczewski, the chief architects of the first complete critical edition in 1884-97. Little progress was made in this direction between the wars. In recent years, however, and especially in the decade which has elapsed since the first edition of this book was published, we have become accustomed not only to complete recordings and performances of the sonatas and symphonies, but also to recordings and serial performances of that rich store-house of good music, the four-hand piano duet works. Even Schubert's more than 600 songs are now available in recorded editions, a far cry from the days when he was represented in the catalogues by, say, thirty songs.

Another symptom of the growing public interest in Schubert's music is the proliferation of Schubert societies and associations throughout the world. Again, we have to look back to the 1860s for the beginning of the story. The Musical Times of June 1866 carried the following announce- ment: SCHUBERT SOCIETY 'The first Soirée Musicale of this recently formed Society took place on Thursday evening April 25th, at the Beethoven Rooms, Harley Street. With a view to spreading still wider a taste for the works of the renowned Franz Schubert, Mr. E. Schubert has set on foot the above Society.' It is good to know that the evening began with a per- formance of the E flat Piano Trio Op. 100, admirably rendered by Miss

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Schubert
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • Preface to the First Edition xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xv
  • 1 - Early Life 1
  • 2 - The Schoolhouse Years (1813-16) 14
  • 3 - The Origins of the Lied 26
  • 4 - Instrumental, Liturgical, and Dramatic Works (1813-16) 37
  • 5 - New Perspectives (1817-March 1821) 50
  • 6 - The Opera Years (1821-3) 73
  • 7 - Poetry and Disillusion (1824) 98
  • 8 - Grand Symphony (1825-6) 114
  • The Winter Journey (1827) 140
  • 10 - The Final Phase (1828) 158
  • Appendix A 183
  • Appendix B 201
  • Appendix C 234
  • Appendix D 253
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.