Appendix C

Personalia
Appendix C gives brief biographies of those people who figures most importantly in Schubert's life, those who most influenced his work or thought, and some of the scholars and performers who helped to bring Schubert's work to the attention of the public during the nineteenth century. It was decided not to include in Appendix C anyone born after Schubert's death ( 1828). Johannes Brahms (b. 1833) is the honourable exception to this rule.
Artaria, Matthias ( 1783-1835). Member of a well-known family of Austrian music publishers. He operated independently in Vienna from 1818 to 1833, and published three important Schubert works in 1826.
Assmayr, Ignaz ( 1790-1862). Pupil of Salieri at the same time as Schubert. He became second court organist in 1825 and Kapellmeister in 1846.
Barbaja, Domenico (? 1778-1841). Italian impresario. His first lease of the court theatres in Vienna ran from the beginning of 1822 to March 1825. A second lease of the Kärntnertor theatre began in April 1826. Barbaja presided over enormously successful seasons of Italian opera, but he also commissioned Weber Euryanthe, and encouraged other German opera composers.
Barth, Josef ( 1781-1865). Tenor in the Imperial Chapel choir. He took part in many performances of Schubert partsongs in the Philharmonic Society entertainments and other concerts.
Bauernfeld, Eduard von ( 1802-90). Viennese dramatist and man of letters. He first met Schubert in January 1822, but the acquaintance only ripened into a close friendship three years later. Bauernfeld played duets with Schubert and was the sole auditor of the first performance of the F minor Duet Fantasie. His satirical talent made him a somewhat critical observer of the antics of the Schubert circle; however, his diary and his reminiscences provide an important primary source of information about the last years of the composer's life.
Beresin, Alexis von. Russian aristocrat, resident in Vienna 1822-3 in the course of his grand tour. His companion on the first part of his journey was P. J. Köppen (q.v.), who later went his own way. Beresin left Vienna for Italy in November 1823 with a new companion, Schubert's friend Leopold Kupelwieser, the painter. In August 1824 Beresin died suddenly in Sicily. Kupelwieser returned to Vienna a year later.
Bernhardt, J. Medical doctor and amateur writer. He attended Schubert in the early stages of his illness, in 1823 and 1824. He wrote an opera libretto which Schubert failed to set. Possibly in recompense, the composer dedicated to him the Six Grand Marches for piano duet, Op. 40.

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Schubert
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • Preface to the First Edition xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xv
  • 1 - Early Life 1
  • 2 - The Schoolhouse Years (1813-16) 14
  • 3 - The Origins of the Lied 26
  • 4 - Instrumental, Liturgical, and Dramatic Works (1813-16) 37
  • 5 - New Perspectives (1817-March 1821) 50
  • 6 - The Opera Years (1821-3) 73
  • 7 - Poetry and Disillusion (1824) 98
  • 8 - Grand Symphony (1825-6) 114
  • The Winter Journey (1827) 140
  • 10 - The Final Phase (1828) 158
  • Appendix A 183
  • Appendix B 201
  • Appendix C 234
  • Appendix D 253
  • Index 261
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