The Wine Song in Classical Arabic Poetry: Abu Nuwas and the Literary Tradition

By Philip F. Kennedy | Go to book overview

4
Ḥilm and Tawba

Whilst a tension existed in the rift between Islam and the hedonistic ethic of the khamriyya, this was consistently defused by either: (i) the contrived and literary or (ii) the apparently sincere abstinence/repentance (tawba) of the poet. The posturing of abstinence/ repentance provided balance within the bacchic tableau. Thus whilst wine and indulgence were eulogized, they were equally subject to a formal and conventional restraint; sometimes they were even unequivocally abandoned. Chapter 3 has shown that wine could be vehemently criticized in poetry and that the roots of this criticism are to be found in the pre-Islamic canon. Similarly abstinence was affected as a specifically Islamic doctrine by the ethics absorbed into the new community--at least through its poetry-- from the jāhiliyya. Islamic tawba was not unrelated, in a sense, to the fulfilment of muruwwa. Indeed, Abū Nuwās' phrase--almasjidu l-jālmi¼u l-muruwwata wa-l-dīna1--suggests that an association between the ethical values of muruwwa and din had at last come to be recognized.

The ensuing discussion will initially illustrate a distinction between abstinence, formulated in a way which merely reiterated sentiments of the ancient canon, and repentance/tawba which was new and peculiarly Islamic. This entails a brief discussion of ḥilm, the quality of character which predicated pre-Islamic abstinence. Whilst ḥilm largely retained the ethical significance which it had had in the jāhiliyya, it was also celebrated as an important value in the Islamic period and in certain cases it even facilitated the expression of specifically Islamic tawba. Thus already in the nascent Islamic period abstinence was formulated in two qualitatively distinct ways, though it was probably perceived by successive generations simply as tawba.

____________________
1
Dīwān Abī Nuwās, 3.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wine Song in Classical Arabic Poetry: Abu Nuwas and the Literary Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Khamr, Nasīb, and Ghazal 19
  • Conclusion: Muslim B. Al-Walīd and Abū Nuwās 81
  • 2 - Islam and Al-Dahr in the Khamriyya 86
  • Conclusion 148
  • 3 - Hijā', the Bacchic Naqā'Iḍ, and the Rhetorical Wine Poem 149
  • 4 - Ḥilm and Tawba 194
  • Conclusion 240
  • Conclusion 241
  • Appendix a the Qaṣīdas of a L-A ˓šā Containing Khamr 245
  • Appendix B - Texts and Translations 262
  • Glossary of Arabic Terms 280
  • Bibliography 286
  • Index of Authors of Secondary Literature 295
  • General Index 297
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.