The Wine Song in Classical Arabic Poetry: Abu Nuwas and the Literary Tradition

By Philip F. Kennedy | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY OF ARABIC TERMS
ʽādhil/ʽādhila: the reprover or censurer. This anonymous figure is a common topos in early Arabic love and wine poetry, and is frequently an introductory topos.
ʽadhl: blame, censure, reproof.
ʽaql: reason, intelligence, mind. It is a facet of ḥilm and is employed as a term in one of the khamriyyāt of Abū Nuwās to contrast with jahl (the antonym of hilm).
ʽaṣabiyya: party-spirit, or a zealous allegiance to the tribe. The term refers to the feuds which arose between some of the Arab tribes in the early Islamic period.
aṭlāl (sing. ṭalal; alternative pl. ṭulūl): the abandoned traces of the beloved's erstwhile campsite. It is the dominant topos of the nasīb.
badīʽ: the use of rhetorical devices in classical Arabic poetry. Badīʽ developed in the late Umayyad and early ʽAbbāsid period and thereafter dominated the expression of the most prominent Arab poets. The most common devices are antithesis (ṭibāq), parallelism (muqābala), and paronomasia (jinās).
bāʼiyya: a qaṣīda or qiṭʽa rhyming in the letter bāʼ.
bidʽa: innovation; in a religious context it has the sense of heresy.
bikr: a maiden or virgin; the noun is sometimes used figuratively to refer to a wine that is still sealed in its container.
birr. righteousness, godliness, piety.
al-dahr: fate--a dominant motif in early Arabic poetry.
dāliyya: a qaṣīda or qiṭʽa rhyming in the letter dāl.
dār (pl. diyār): house or abode. In the nasīb, and Arabic lyrical poetry in general, it is used to refer to the abode of the beloved. In some cases it clearly has the same significance as the aṭlāl.
dihqān: a member of the lesser feudal nobility in Sāsānian Persia; the title was applied more loosely in Islamic times. In the khamriyyāt the vintner is oftened described as a dihqān.
dīn: religion.
dīwān: the collected poems of an individual poet.
fakhr: one of the major categories of poetry. It is essentially any poetry where the poet vaunts himself.
fann (pl. funūn): art. The term is also used in Arabic with the meaning of genre.
faqīh: an expert in fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence).

-280-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wine Song in Classical Arabic Poetry: Abu Nuwas and the Literary Tradition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.