The Forsyte Saga

By John Galsworthy; Geoffrey Harvey | Go to book overview
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A CHRONOLOGY OF
JOHN GALSWORTHY

ALL of Galsworthy's fiction produced under his own name, from The Island Pharisees ( 1904) onwards, was published in London by Heinemann, and following A Motley ( 1910) in New York by Scribner's. The dates given are for the English editions. His plays were published by Duckworth.

1867 (14 Aug.) Born at 'Parkfield', Kingston Hill, Surrey, the second
child of John and Blanche Galsworthy.
1868 Family moves to Coombe, Surrey.
1876 To a private school in Bournemouth.
1881 To Harrow School.
1886 To New College, Oxford, to read Law. Family moves to Ken-
sington Palace Mansions.
1887 Family moves to 8 Cambridge Gate.
1889 To Lincoln's Inn to study for the Bar.
1890 (30 Apr.) Called to the Bar.
1891 (Summer) To Vancouver Island on behalf of his father to enquire
into the running of a coal-mining company.
1892 (Nov.) Tour to Australia and New Zealand.
1893 (18 Mar.) Boards the Torrens at Adelaide and meets Joseph Conrad,
who was the first mate. (Summer) Meets Aria, the wife of his
cousin, Arthur Galsworthy. Visits Russia on behalf of his father
to investigate a factory at Ekaterinoslav.
1894 (Nov.) Takes legal chambers at 3 Paper Buildings, Temple.
1895 (Spring) Abandons legal practice for writing. (3 Sept.) John and
Ada begin their affair.
1897 (July) From the Four Winds, short stories, published under the pseudonym John Sinjohn (Unwin).
1898 (May) Jocelyn, published under the pseudonym John Sinjohn
(Duckworth).
1900 (Summer) Meets Edward Garnett, an editor and publisher's
reader, who became a close friend. (Autumn) Villa Rubein, pub-
lished under the pseudonym John Sinjohn (Duckworth).
1901 (Autumn) A Man of Devon, short stories published under the
pseudonym John Sinjohn (Blackwoods).

-xxiv-

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