The Forsyte Saga

By John Galsworthy; Geoffrey Harvey | Go to book overview

had his first child at twenty-two; and Mr Jolyon, married while he was at Cambridge, had his child the same year--gracious Peter! That was back in '70, a long time before old Mr Jolyon-- fine judge of property--had taken his Will away from Mr James-- dear, yes! Those were the days when they were buyin' property right and left, and none of this khaki and fallin' over one another to get out of things; and cucumbers at twopence; and a melon-- the old melons, that made your mouth water! Fifty years since he went into Mr James's office, and Mr James had said to him: 'Now, Gradman, you're only a shaver--you pay attention, and you'll make your five hundred a year before you've done.' And he had, and feared God, and served the Forsytes, and kept a vegetable diet at night. And, buying a copy of John Bull--not that he approved of it, an extravagant affair--he entered the Tube elevator with his mere brown-paper parcel, and was borne down into the bowels of the earth.


CHAPTER VI
SOAMES'S PRIVATE LIFE

ON his way to Green Street it occurred to Soames that he ought to go into Dumetrius' in Suffolk Street about the possibility of the Bolderby Old Crome.* Almost worth while to have fought the war to have the Bolderby Old Crome, as it were, in flux! Old Bolderby had died, his son and grandson had been killed--a cousin was coming into the estate, who meant to sell it, some said because of the condition of England, others said because he had asthma.

If Dumetrius once got hold of it the price would become prohibitive; it was necessary for Soames to find out whether Dumetrius had got it, before he tried to get it himself. He therefore confined himself to discussing with Dumetrius whether Monticellis would come again now that it was the fashion for a picture to be anything except a picture; and the future of Johns, with a side-slip into Buxton Knights.* It was only when leaving that he added: 'So they're not selling the Bolderby Old Crome, after all?' In sheer pride of racial superiority, as he had calculated would be the case, Dumetrius replied:

'Oh! I shall get it, Mr Forsyte, sir!'

-744-

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