Subtle Is the Lord: The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein

By Abraham Pais | Go to book overview

28
Epilogue

I saw Einstein for the last time in December 1954.

As he had not been well, he had for some weeks been absent from the Institute, where he normally spent a few hours each morning. Since I was about to take a term's leave from Princeton, I called Helen Dukas and asked her to be kind enough to give my best wishes to Professor Einstein. She suggested I come to the house for a brief visit and a cup of tea. I was, of course, glad to accept. After I arrived, I went upstairs and knocked at the door of Einstein's study. There was his gentle 'Come.' As I entered, he was seated in his arm chair, a blanket over his knees, a pad on the blanket. He was working. He put his pad aside at once and greeted me. We spent a pleasant half hour or so; I do not recall what was discussed. Then I told him I should not stay any longer. We shook hands, and I said goodbye. I walked to the door of the study, not more than four or five steps away. I turned around as I opened the door. I saw him in his chair, his pad back on his lap, a pencil in his hand, oblivious to his surroundings.

He was back at work.

-479-

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Subtle Is the Lord: The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To the Reader vii
  • Contents (entries in Italics Are Almost Entirely Biographical) xi
  • I- Introductory 3
  • 1- Purpose and Plan 5
  • 2- Relativity Theory and Quantum Theory 26
  • 3 - Portrait of the Physicist as a Young Man 49
  • II- Statistical Physics 53
  • 4- Entropy and Probability 55
  • 5- The Reality of Molecules 79
  • III- Relativity, the Special Theory 109
  • 6- ''subtle is the Lord . . .'' 111
  • 7- The New Kinematics 138
  • 8- The Edge of History 163
  • IV- Relativity, the General Theory 175
  • 9- ''The Happiest Thought of My Life'' 177
  • References 184
  • 10- Herr Professor Einstein 190
  • 11- The Prague Papers 192
  • 12- The Einstein-Grossmann Collaboration 208
  • 12- The Einstein-Grossmann Collaboration 208
  • References 228
  • 13- Field Theories of Gravitation 237
  • 14- The Field Equations of Gravitation 239
  • 15 - The New Dynamics 292
  • V- The Later Journey 297
  • 16- ''The Suddenly Famous Doctor Einstein'' 299
  • 17- Unified Field Theory 325
  • VI - The Quantum Theory 355
  • 18 - Preliminaries 363
  • 19- The Light-Quantum 364
  • 20- Einstein and Specific Heats 389
  • 21- The Photon 402
  • 22- Interlude- The Bks Proposal 416
  • 23- A Loss of Identity 423
  • 24- Einstein as a Transitional Figure 435
  • 25- Einstein''s Response to the New Dynamics 440
  • 26- Einstein''s Vision 460
  • VII- Journey''s End 471
  • 27- The Final Decade 473
  • 28- Epilogue 479
  • VIII- Appendices 481
  • 29- Of Tensors and a Hearing Aid and Many Other Things 483
  • 30- How Einstein Got the Nobel Prize 502
  • 31 - Einstein''s Proposals for the Nobel Prize 518
  • 32- An Einstein Chronology 520
  • Name Index 531
  • Subject Index 539
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