Monumental Anxieties: Homoerotic Desire and Feminine Influence in 19th Century U.S. Literature

By Scott S. Derrick | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

No one produces a book or is fortunate enough to have a career as a literary academic without accumulating a considerable string of debts and obligations. I have received different kinds of help at different times, but always support and encouragement, from Elaine Scarry, Paul Morrison, Peter Conn, David Minter, Meredith Skura, Devon Hodges, Susan Lurie, Carol Quillen, David Nirenberg, Jane Dailey, Robyn Warhol, Deborah Harter, Billy Flesch, Laura Quinney, Robert Lucid, Wendy Steiner, Hans Bergmann, Allen Grossman, Lauren Berlant, Colleen Lamos, Denise Albanese, Inderpal Grewal, Jeff Woodward, Richard Androne, Mary Jane Androne, Christopher Newfield, Michael T. Gilmore, and Michael Booth.

I owe thanks to Allen Matusow, former dean of humanities at Rice University, for an invaluable semester of junior leave, and Walter Isle, the chair of the Rice University English Department, for his always generous and unflappable support. Terry Munísteri copyedited the whole several times over at various stages of its genesis with her usual patience, grasp of issues, and attention to detail. Lanita Martin provided steadying technical support and hands-on aid for a formidable string of computing befuddlements. Two talented graduate students at Rice aided in the preparation of the manuscript: Jenny Stearns, who checked a portion of the book for errors and inconsistencies, and Louise Penner, whose reliable and intelligent help with the whole was irreplaceable. I am grateful to Susannah Driver, who copyedited the manuscript for Rutgers University Press and identified with remarkable accuracy random errors, repeated errors, and general inadequacies.

I would like to thank Leslie Mitchner, at Rutgers University Press, for her kindness, editorial wisdom and general guidance in turning this manuscript into a book.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Monumental Anxieties: Homoerotic Desire and Feminine Influence in 19th Century U.S. Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.