Monumental Anxieties: Homoerotic Desire and Feminine Influence in 19th Century U.S. Literature

By Scott S. Derrick | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION Authoring the Self
1.
There is a danger of reinscribing the male canon through the act of critiquing it, as Nina Baym suggests in the cautionary and still relevant "Melodramas of Beset Manhood." If I cannot entirely avoid such a danger, I nonetheless hope that articulating the sex/gender dynamics at work in this tradition justifies dwelling on such a traditional body of masculine texts. See "Melodramas of Beset Manhood: How Theories of American Fiction Exclude Women Authors," American Quarterly 33, no. 2 (summer 1981): 123-139.
2.
This transformation has been well documented. See, for example, William Charvat's Literary Publishing in America, 1790-1850 ( Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1959); Nina Baym, "The Triumph of the Novel," in Novels, Readers, and Reviewers: Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984), 26-43; Michael T. Gilmore, introduction to American Romanticism and the Marketplace ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 1-17; and John E Kasson, "Etiquette Books and the Spread of Gentility," in Rudeness and Civility: Manners in Nineteenth-Century Urban America ( New York: Hill and Wang, 1990), 34-69, and especially 37-44.
3.
For a useful review of this debate, see Stuart M. Blumin, "The Hypothesis of Middle-Class Formation in Nineteenth-Century America: A Critique and Some Proposals," American Historical Review 90, no. 2 ( April 1985): 299-338.
4.
John Greenleaf Whittier, "The Nervous Man," in Whittier on Writers and Writing, ed. Edwin Harrison Cady and Harry Hayden Clark ( Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1950), 99.
5.
Letter quoted by Perry Miller in "John Greenleaf Whittier: The Conscience in Poetry," in Critical Essays on John Greenleaf Whittier, ed. Jayne K. Kribbs ( Boston: G. K. Hall, 1980), 216.
6.
Whittier, "American Literature," in Whittier on Writers and Writing, 25-26.
7.
For the first quoted passage, see Nathaniel Hawthorne, "To Elizabeth C. Hathorne, Raymond," Tuesday, March 7, 1820, in The Letters, 1813-1843, vol. 15, ed. Thomas Woodson, L. Neal Smith, and Norman Holmes Pearson, TheCentenary Edition of The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne

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