Bill Haywood's Book: The Autobiography of William D. Haywood

By William D. Haywood | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
THE BOISE TRIAL

My trial began on the ninth of May, 1907. William E. Borah, who had been elected United States Senator by the previous legislature, the man who had prosecuted Paul Corcoran, was a special prosecutor in this case. James Hawley, a one-time miner who had been the lawyer for the Cceur d'Alenes prisoners when they had occupied the jail we now lived in, was also a special prosecutor. Hawley was the man who had suggested to the imprisoned miners that an organization should be formed comprising all the miners of the West. The Caldwell County attorney was one of the assistant prosecutors.

A suggestion was made that Eugene V. Debs should be invited to come to Boise to write up the trial for the Appeal to Reason. Debs was then at the height of his fame and was the spokesman for a vast number of working-class people, and a leader of the Socialist Party. This suggestion was discussed by Darrow, Richardson, my fellow prisoners and myself. Moyer and Pettibone were not interested in having Debs come to Boise, and Darrow raised vigorous objections, without giving any definite reason. His opposition could not have been because of Debs being a Socialist. I, too, was a Socialist, and Darrow himself, with Jack London and some others, had some time before issued a call for the organization of a society to promote an intelligent interest in Socialism among college men and women, which resulted in the formation of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society. I searched my mind for Darrow's reason for objecting to Debs' presence, and could think of nothing but his desire to be recognized as the most prominent person in the trial.

The attorneys for the defense sat at a table on the right of the courtroom. When my mother, wife and daughters came to the court, they occupied a place inside the railing. Correspondents of different newspapers were back of the attorneys on either side of the courtroom. Judge Woods presided, on an elevated platform behind the jury. I sat so near the first juryman in the front row that I could

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bill Haywood's Book: The Autobiography of William D. Haywood
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.