A Source Book for Medieval Economic History

By Roy C. Cave; Herbert H. Coulson | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PAGE
PREFACEix
PART I. AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES
SECTION
I. THE BARBARIANS3
Introduction. 1. The Huns. 2. The Germans. 3. The Anglo- Saxons. 4. The Farmer's Law.
II. V ILLA AND MANORIAL ORGANIZATION14
Introduction. 1. Laws of Ine. 2. Capitulary of Aquitaine. 3. Capitulary of the Imperial Estates (De Villis). 4. Capitulary of Aix-la-Chapelle. 5. Commendation. 6. Duties of the Coloni. 7. King Harald's (Harfager) Laws for Land Property. 8. Title of the Domesday Inquest for Ely. 9. Excerpt from the Survey of the County of Sussex. 10. Henry II's Inquest of Sheriffs. 11. The Office of the Seneschal. 12. The Office of Provost. 13. The Office of Hayward.
III. CULTIVATION37
Introduction. 1. Palladius on Husbandrie. 2. Administration of Papal Estates. 3. Polyptyque de I'Abbé Irminon. 4. Formulae for Describing Royal Fiscs and Benefices. 5. A Description of the Personnel of the Estates of the Monks of St. Bertin. 6. The Work of a Serf. 7. Manors Held by the Abbey of St. Peter, Winchester. 8. Survey of Lands and Tenements. 9. Overseeing of Labor. 10. Cost of Producing Wheat. 11. Inspection of Cattle. 12. Cost of Labor. 13. Farming Out the Issue of Stock.
IV. PRODUCE56
Introduction. 1. Agricultural Credit. 2. Formulae for Describing Royal Fiscs and Benefices. 3. Grant of Fishing Rights. 4. Rent -- Payment in Kind and in Money. 5. The Pipe Roll of the Bishopric of Winchester. 6. The Lord's Sojourn on His Manors.

-xiii-

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A Source Book for Medieval Economic History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I - Agriculture, Forestry, And Extractive Industries 1
  • Section I - The Barbarians 3
  • Section II - Villa and Manorial Organization 14
  • Section III - Cultivation 37
  • Section IV - Produce 56
  • Section V - Forests 70
  • Section VI - The Extractive Industries 76
  • Part II - Commerce 87
  • Section I - Trade and Exchange 89
  • Section II - Fairs and Markets 112
  • Section III - Money and Prices 126
  • Section IV - Shipping and Inland Transportation 148
  • Section V - Loans and Usury 169
  • Section VI - Partnerships 183
  • Part III - Town Economy 191
  • Section I - Towns and Gilds 193
  • Section III - Craft Gilds and Industry 234
  • Appendix - Florentine Crafts Subject to Tax 258
  • Part IV - Slavery and Serfdom 261
  • Section I - Roman Law 263
  • Section II - Barbarian and Feudal Laws 270
  • Section III - Church Councils 280
  • Part V - Wealth and Property 303
  • Section I - Forms of Wealth 305
  • Section II - Private Property 325
  • Section III - Inheritance 334
  • Part VI - Taxation 347
  • Section I - Taxes and Feudal Dues 349
  • Section II - Tithes 377
  • 8- Fine of the Abbot of Croyland To Recover His Lands 391
  • Section IV - Tolls 398
  • Glossary 423
  • Bibliography 435
  • Index 447
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