Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement

By Harold D. Guither | Go to book overview

15
Financing Animal Rights and Animal Welfare Activities

Animal protection has become an industry financed by donations and bequests from a generous society. Incomes and assets of animal rights and animal welfare organizations vary widely, and financial security is not guaranteed. Some groups thrive while others struggle as they lose support. Emotional appeals for contributions to help stop mistreatment of animals flood the mails continuously. Scattered reports suggest that some funds may be used for purposes that the donors did not suspect.

W hether identified as animal welfare, animal rights, animal liberation, or animal protection, activism to improve the conditions by which animals are raised, cared for, used by humans, or protected in the wild has evolved into a substantial charitable industry. In 1989, the budgets of major national and regional organizations totaled an estimated $107 million and asset holdings, $232 million. When including all state and local animal and habitat protection groups, the estimate for public contributions totaled $3.12 billion for 1992.1
Organization Leadership
The accomplishments and success of an animal protection organization depends upon the dedication and capability of its leaders as well as its financial strength. Animal welfare and animal rights leaders fall into one or more of these categories:
Those who have independent wealth or other sources of income and choose to devote part of their time to promote animal protection and humane treatment without additional salary. Some leaders that fit this group include Cleveland Amory, president, FFA; Shirley McGreal, president, International Primate Protection League; and Christine Stevens, president, AWI. Ingrid Newkirk, vice president and cofounder of PETA draws no salary, but the extent of her wealth or other sources of income are uncertain. She should also be classified in the third group.
Those professionals employed to manage and direct the organization and the policies established by a board of directors and who receive substantial salaries

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