Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement

By Harold D. Guither | Go to book overview

Appendix 3
Chronology of Animal Welfare in Europe, 1964-1995
1964In England, Ruth Harrison wrote Animal Machines, which stimulated concerns and
led to development of animal welfare policies and regulations in several western Eu-
ropean countries. This book initiated much of the public concern for the welfare of
farm animals under modern production methods.
1965The report of the Technical Committee, commonly referred to as the Brambell Report,
defined certain principles of animal welfare and recommended certain mandatory.
standards in the care and production of food animals in the United Kingdom. The
Brambell Report set the stage for animal welfare policy and regulations. This report
identified the "five freedoms" that established the basis for animal welfare controls:
(1) freedom from thirst, hunger, and malnutrition; (2) appropriate comfort and shel-
ter; (3) the prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment of injury, disease, or infesta-
tion; (4) freedom from fear; (5) freedom to display most normal patterns of behavior.
1967The United Kingdom Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food set up the Farm Ani-
mal Welfare Advisory Committee, later renamed and enlarged as the Farm Animal
Welfare Council, as a response to the Brambell Report.
1968Parliament passed the Agriculture (Miscellaneous Provisions Act, which recom-
mended codes of practices for the housing and management for intensively kept live-
stock.
1969The Council of Europe issued the European Convention for the Protection of Ani-
mals during International Transport.
1971The United Kingdom Ministry of Agriculture issued its first Codes of Recommenda-
tions for the Welfare of Livestock, which at that time were advisory, not mandatory.
The Swedish parliament passed a law that required that new housing for ani-
mals must be approved by the County Agricultural Board; the board would consider
animal protection before government credit could be obtained. In 1973, the law was
extended to include all remodeling and construction whether government credit was
involved or not.

-212-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.