Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook

By Denise D. Knight | Go to book overview

conservative or progressive in regard to women characters. Maida points out that her early novels place women in passive roles, but works such as The Circular Study, published at the turn of the century, exhibit "provocative change." In this particular novel, the rape of a young woman "reveals a shocking, though real, evil," one Maida sees as alerting readers to the authentic crimes endured by women ( "Legacy"56). However, the sexual ruin of an innocent woman is a novelistic convention older than Charlotte Temple, and when Green's victim wastes away and dies from her dishonor, one might question the extent to which Green is accurately representing women's experience. Similarly, Hayne counters the claim that Violet Strange's secret motive for crime-solving subverts patriarchy by contending that Strange repeatedly reinforces essentialist assumptions of feminine intuition and instinctual disdain of sordid affairs (174). Hayne and others see Amelia Butterworth as the more reliably feminist detective.


WORKS CITED

Green, Anna Katharine. The Leavenworth Case. New York: Putnam's, 1878.

Hayne, Barrie. "Anna Katharine Green." In 10 Women of Mystery, edited by Earl F. Bargainnier . Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1981. 150-178.

Maida, Patricia D. "Legacy Profile: Anna Katharine Green (1846-1935)." Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 3, no. 2 ( 1986): 53-59.

-----. Mother of Detective Fiction: The Life and Works of Anna Katharine Green. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1989.

Ross, Cheri L. "The First Feminist Detective: Anna Katharine Green's Amelia Butterworth." Journal of Popular Culture 25, no. 2 ( 1991): 77-86.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Works by Anna Katharine Green

Novels

The Leavenworth Case. New York: Putnam's, 1878.

A Strange Disappearance. New York: Putnam's, 1880.

The Sword of Damocles. New York: Putnam's, 1881.

Hand and Ring. New York: Putnam's, 1883.

XYZ. New York: Putnam's, 1883.

The Mill Mystery. New York: Putnam's, 1886.

7 to 12. New York: Putnam's, 1887.

Behind Closed Doors. New York: Putnam's, 1888.

The Forsaken Inn. New York: R. Bonner's Sons, 1890.

A Matter of Millions. New York: R. Bonner's Sons, 1890.

Cynthia Wakeham's Money. New York: Putnam's, 1892.

Marked "Personal." New York: Putnam's, 1893.

-170-

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