Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook

By Denise D. Knight | Go to book overview

MARIETTA HOLLEY (JOSIAH ALLEN'S WIFE) (1836-1926)

Kate H. Winter


BIOGRAPHY

On July 16, 1836, Marietta Holley was the seventh and last child born into a farm family in rural upstate New York near a village then known as Bear Creek. In an area that was still New York's frontier, her father, John Milton Holley, and her mother, Mary Taber, managed a modest living with the help of their children, and as a girl, Marietta learned domestic skills and farm work while she furtively wrote poems and stories on whatever scraps of paper she could find. At fourteen she finished her formal schooling in the one-room district school and began a lifelong habit of wide reading that fed her literary ambitions and enlarged her world. When her brothers left for the California gold fields in the 1850s, Holley helped support her sisters and aging parents by giving music lessons and bartering handcrafts. Innately shy, and nearly silenced by a speech impediment, she continued to write poetry in the popular style. At the age of twenty-one she saw her first work in print in the local newspaper, appearing under the pseudonym "Jemyma," the first of her pen names. Later she more boldly used "M. H." and the British spelling of her father's name, "Hawley." In 1867, Peterson's magazine first published one of her poems with "Marietta Holley" appended to it, and she began to realize a small income from her writing. Heartened by the response to her work, in 1869 she sent out two short stories written in the style of the dialect humorists and bearing her newest pseudonym "Josiah Allen's Wife." The choice of name was a shrewd one, disguising Holley herself and making her outspoken protagonist--a woman's rights advocate--seem less threatening than the zealous suffragists, thereby gaining a new audience for their feminist arguments. From that point on, her work ap

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 540

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.