Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw

By George Walton Williams | Go to book overview

I.
THE POET-SAINT AND THE BAROQUE

RICHARD CRASHAW diffidently subtitled the two collections of his secular poems "Other Poems", and by that deliberate otherness set them apart from his principal work, subtitled "Sacred Poems". The best that could be said of the secular Delights of the Muses was that they were "as sweet as they [were] innocent." The sacred poems on the other hand were the Steps to the Temple by which and through which the reader was "to climbe heaven"; they were the Carmen Deo Nostro which aimed "to burne the hart with heauenly fire." Thus the dulce of the secular poems was as clearly marked as was the utile of the sacred poems; where the secular poems pleased merely, the sacred poems purposed no less than "to measure the soule into that better world."1 In terms of high purpose, sacred poetry was the chief of the delights of the muse of Richard Crashaw.

The earliest poems of this "Poet and Saint" were translations of the Psalms; the earliest published poem was introductory to a volume of sermons. Crashaw first printed book was his Epigrammatum sacrorum liber, published in Cambridge in 1634, a collection of his sacred epigrams in Latin; a second edition, enlarged, appeared in 1670. Other Latin religious epigrams, preserved in manuscripts, were published posthumously.2 Most of his maturer religious poems, composed in English (some of them were translations of the epigrams), Crashaw published in two editions of his Steps to the Temple ( London, 1646 and 1648), the second edition repeating the contents of the first and adding paraphrases of several medieval hymns. Many of the longer poems in the editions of 1646 and 1648, extensively revised before Crashaw's death in 1649, were posthumously published with the hymns as Carmen Deo Nostro ( Paris, 1652) under the editorship of Thomas Car, Crashaw's friend. The volume included a poem to the Countess of Denbigh, a longer and much altered version of which was printed separately as A Letter to the Countess of Denbigh ( 1653?). These manuscripts and printed books constitute the corpus of Crashaw's sacred poetry.

____________________
1
L. C. Martin, The Poems English Latin and Greek of Richard Crashaw (2nd edit., Oxford, 1957), pp.147, 213; 73, 205, 231; 76, 235, 75. All quotations from Crashaw are taken from this text.
2
In Alexander B. Grosart, The Complete Works of Richard Crashaw ( London, 1872).

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Image and Symbol in the Sacred Poetry of Richard Crashaw
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - The Poet-Saint and the Baroque 1
  • II - Quantity 12
  • III - White and Red 33
  • IV - Light and Dark 57
  • V - Liquidity 84
  • VI - Other Symbols and Images 105
  • Bibliography 137
  • Indices 146
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 151

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.