Britain Divided: The Effect of the Spanish Civil War on British Political Opinion

By K. W. Watkins | Go to book overview

Appendix C

Full text of the Resolution passed at the Conference held by the Labour and Socialist International and the International Federation of Trade Unions, held in the Central Hall, London, on 10 and 11 March 1937.

The Conference convened by the Labour and Socialist International and the International Federation of Trade Unions, at the request of the Spanish comrades meeting in London, 10-11 March 1937.

Greets the Spanish people who are conducting with such courage their fight against the combined forces of Fascism, and are defending at one and the same time their own liberty and the liberty and peace of Europe and the world.

From the very beginning of the conflict, the two Internationals have never ceased to demonstrate its character before world public opinion. Events have shown that their fears were only too well- founded. To-day it is evident to all that we are faced with a deliberate aggression by Fascist Italy and Germany against Spain, and, that, as President Azaña has so correctly stated, Spain is engaged, not in a civil war, but in a war of national liberation. Not only have the Fascist Powers supplied the rebels with arms and munitions, in violation of their undertakings, but they have also supplied them with the aviation in which they were lacking, and also perhaps, with naval forces. They have even landed large contingents of men, armed and already formed into detachments, amounting in all to the strength of several army corps. The fact that these men have been termed 'volunteers' in no way alters the character of the crime which has been committed against international law.

Moreover, whilst Spain has thus been attacked, in obvious violation of the League Covenant, not only has it not received, in any form, the help which it was legitimately entitled to expect, but it has been deprived of the ordinary right of procuring in the free market those articles most indispensable for its defence. The two Internationals have always protested against such a state of affairs.

An attempt is now being made to correct the obvious disadvantages of a system which in practice does not deserve the name of 'non-intervention' by a system of 'control'. Guided by past experience, the two Internationals are not convinced that the present measures will improve the situation. In the absence of the will to co-operate by the Fascist Powers, considerable time will be necessary to get together the corps of observers whom it is proposed to have on board the ships, and during the whole of this time the rebels will continue to receive supplies whilst those of the Government will be

-246-

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Britain Divided: The Effect of the Spanish Civil War on British Political Opinion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - British Interests and the Spanish Civil War 1
  • 2 - Image and Reality 13
  • 3 - Non-Intervention 71
  • 4 - The British Right 83
  • 5 - The British Left 141
  • 6 - Spain and the Second World War 196
  • 7 - 'Conflicts -- Resolved and Unresolved' 202
  • Conclusion 234
  • Postscript 237
  • Appendix A 239
  • Appendix B 245
  • Appendix C 246
  • Appendix D 248
  • Appendix E 249
  • Appendix F 252
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 262
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