Food and the Status Quest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

By Polly Wiessner; Wulf Schiefenhövel | Go to book overview
things of some utility within the multidisciplinary discussion of the issue of "food and the status quest" to which this volume is directed. First, archaeology does have the potential to contribute to an understanding of the long-term historical development of the ways in which food is employed in the quest for power and status. Secondly, an approach to archaeological data through the perspective of "commensal politics" has the potential to reveal significant new insights into social processes and relations in ancient societies. These are both avenues of research that have yet to be developed and exploited to any significant extent in archaeology; but given further conceptual and methodological refinements, they hold considerable promise of advancing understanding beyond current frontiers.
Notes
My hearty thanks to Polly Wiessner and Wulf Schiefenhövel for the invitation to participate in this most enjoyable encounter and for the lavish hospitality and transport provided by the Max Planck Gesellschaft. Thanks also to Polly for helpful editorial suggestions and the generous extension of her home and table. I am also most grateful to all my commensal companions for stimulating and enlightening discussion that took place in both the formal symposium and the numerous informal symposia (in the original sense) during our stay at the Ringberg castle.
1. The techniques being developed for the physico-chemical analysis of the organic contents of ancient vessels ( Biers and McGovern 1990) hold considerable promise for improving our knowledge of culinary complexity, but this field is still in the preliminary experimental stages.
2. Given the diverse disciplinary backgrounds of participants in this volume, it is perhaps advisable to emphasize that I use the term "commensal" in its more literal, original sense (from Latin com mensalis) having to do with sharing a table, or eating together, rather than in its more specialized usage in biology. Needless to say, the table is simply a handy Eurocentric metaphor; people in many societies around the world eat together without this device.
3. Brian Hayden (this volume) employs a more inclusive range of activities under the rubric of feasting and develops a somewhat different typology of patterns. These differences do not necessarily indicate disagreement, but rather simply reflect our contrasting focuses of analysis on "commensal politics" versus the competitive use of food as a more generalized phenomenon.
4. The term "entrepreneurial feast" should not be misunderstood as some sort of crude formalist economic concept, nor as an attempt to distinguish a type of specialized feast involving openly aggressive contests (as distinct from, for example, a

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food and the Status Quest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.