Food and the Status Quest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

By Polly Wiessner; Wulf Schiefenhövel | Go to book overview
"harmonious egalitarian" community celebration). I use the term metaphorically to refer to an effective political role of feast events of various kinds rather than necessarily to refer to the conscious intention of the hosts. While this role is sometimes fully, or at least partially, recognized by the participants, much of the effectiveness of this political mechanism derives from the fact that it often entails a kind of collective misrecognition or euphemization of the self-interested nature of the practice. Likewise, in using the term "competitive" I am not referring only to activities that involve an overt aggressive challenge. Prestige and free-floating power are always competitive in that they describe conditions of relative dominance and subordination between people. Hence, commensal politics is always competitive in its effects, even though the process may be thoroughly euphemized. I would maintain, for example, that celebratory feasts of community identity and unity are simultaneously arenas for entrepreneurial manipulation (see the earlier discussion of the nature of public ritual).
5. Of course, quotidian meals are also "ritualized" events. They are highly structured sequences of action that serve to shape the "habitus" of individuals, inculcating dispositions guiding practice and naturalizing the social order ( Mauss 1936; Bourdieu 1977). They differ from more formal ritual events mainly in being less consciously public performances.
6. A more detailed and nuanced analysis of this pattern is, of course, necessary. At a minimum one ought to differentiate between service or table wares that would be associated with food and drink consumption and cooking pots that might, for example, simply indicate gender roles.
7. It is important to point out that a general increase in the complexity or elaborateness of the decoration of tablewares in comparison to cooking wares (or of ceramics in general in comparison to a previous period) is not necessarily an indication of the use of style in the development of diacritical feasts. This may simply be related to an increasing "complexity" of food consumption patterns ( Douglas 1984) through symbolic emphasis on distinctions such as that between ritual and quotidian dining practice. The diacritical feast pattern rests on an exclusive sumptuary use of style in food consumption rituals by certain social groups or classes whatever the relative complexity of food patterns.

References
Appadurai A. 1981. Gastropolitics in Hindu South Asia. American Ethnologist 8: 494-511.
Appadurai A. 1986. Introduction: commodities and the politics of value. In The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective. ed. A. Appadurai , 3-63. Cambridge: Cambridge Univer. Press.
Arcelin-Pradelle C. 1984. "La céramique grise monochrome en Provence". Supplement 10 of the Révue Archéologique de Narbonnaise. Paris: Boccard.
Athenaeus. The Deipnosophists, vol. II, trans. C. B. Gulick, 1928. London: Heinemann.
Barker G. 1985. Prehistoric Farming in Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge Univer. Press.

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food and the Status Quest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.