Food and the Status Quest: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

By Polly Wiessner; Wulf Schiefenhövel | Go to book overview

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
Ingrid Nina Bell-Krannhals Ph.D. studied anthropology and linguistics at the University of Basel in Switzerland. She has conducted fieldwork with the Lummi Indians, State of Washington, in 1980, resulting in M.A. thesis on traditional and modern fishing technology. As of 1982, she has been doing fieldwork in the Trobriand Islands, Papua New Guinea, resulting in a Ph.D. thesis on property and possession. Between 1982-1987 she worked at the Research Group for Human Ethology in the Max-Planck-Society. Since 1987 she has been a lecturer at the Institute of Anthropology at the University of Basel, Switzerland.
Peter Damerow studied mathematics and philosophy at the Free University of Berlin. He now works as a senior scientist for the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Education in Berlin conducting research on culture and cognition with a focus on the history of number concepts.
Michael Dietler is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. His graduate education was at the University of California, Berkeley ( PhD. 1990). His primary archaeological research focus is the colonial encounter in Iron Age southern France, particularly the role of consumption in the political economy. He has also conducted ethnoarchaeological research on material culture and economic history in western Kenya and is engaged in a study of the manipulation of Celtic identity in modern Europe.
Günter Dresrüsse is currently a Director at the FAO Agricultural Services Division in Rome. He has an academic background in tropical agriculture and social, agricultural and political economics. Before joining FAO, he spent fourteen years working for the GTZ,

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