Labour Markets, Poverty, and Development

By Giorgio Barba Navaretti; Riccardo Faini et al. | Go to book overview

6
Does the Labour Market Explain Lower Female Schooling? Evidence from Three African Countries

Simon Appleton, John Hoddinott, Pramila Krishnan, and Kerry Max


1. INTRODUCTION

Human capital formation is receiving increasing attention from both policy-makers and academics interested in promoting economic development. Models of endogenous growth stress the importance of investment in knowledge, including basic education and training, as critical factors in the expansion of GDP. Proponents of basic needs and capability approaches have long argued that education should form a principal component of development strategy. Many authors have stressed that investments in the education of women lead to better child health, lower fertility and reduced maternal mortality. Consequently, attention is increasingly focused on the means of achieving higher levels of human capital formation. This has both supply and demand-side aspects. Attention with respect to the latter has focused on factors affecting parental decisions to invest in their children's education. These include parental preferences for boys or girls, efficiency considerations (the relative costs and benefits of educating sons and daughters), and the 'voice' or bargaining power of individual parents in the decision-making process.

Though concern over human capital formation is relevant in all regions of the developing world, they are most acute in sub-Saharan Africa. This region contains many of the world's poorest countries; it is also particularly poorly endowed with human capital. Though there does not exist gender biases in certain aspects of human capital formation--unlike parts of south Asia, there is no evidence of females being disadvantaged with respect to child anthropometric status or longevity ( Svedberg 1990)--women receive, on average, less education, and as Table 6.1 reveals. The fact that this divergence occurs only in education, and is especially marked at the post-primary

____________________
A later draft of this paper was presented at the ESRC Development Economics Study Group Annual Conference on 'Human Development' at Leicester University, 25 March 1995. We are grateful for comments by John Knight, Jennifer Roberts and other participants. The work contained in this paper has been partially funded by the World Bank.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labour Markets, Poverty, and Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.