Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp

By Dan Isaac Slobin; Julie Gerhardt et al. | Go to book overview

modes of discourse)? -- we have tried to approach this problem through an analysis of certain dimensions of the context. Thus, a set of four assumptions were proposed which are claimed to constitute the core of psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy and as such play a role in structuring the types of interventions which are made, and thus ultimately, the client's mode of response. It should be mentioned that the assumptions listed are not intended to be exhaustive. For example, no mention is made of the various assumptions about the asymmetry of knowledge and power which play a role in structuring certain nonreciprocal aspects of the psychodynamic encounter (e.g., the fact that the therapist has authority in interpreting the meaning of the client's behavior, but not vice versa, see R. Lakoff, 1990). Instead, we have narrowed our focus to only those assumptions which are claimed to play a role in bringing about the self-reflexive analytic stance. It was proposed that based on these assumptions, the therapist intervenes in such a way which serves to induce the client to turn her attention to the vicissitudes of her subjective experience. Indeed, our interest in the discourse markers I mean and I don't know is precisely due to their putative role in helping to carry out the therapeutic task as defined by these assumptions. In other words, our claim has been that the client's use of I mean and I don't know functions as a means of acknowledging, responding to, and wrestling with the therapist's direct or indirect requests to examine her self.


REFERENCES

Aron, L. ( 1991). "The patient's experience of the analyst's subjectivity", Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 1, 29-51.

Bakhtin, M. ( 1981). Discourse in the novel. In M. Holquist (Ed.), The dialogic imagination: Four essays by M. M. Bakhtin. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Burke, K. ( 1945). A grammar of motives. New York: Prentice-Hall.

Coupland, N., Coupland, J., Giles, H., Henwood K., & Wiemann, J. ( 1988). "Elderly self-disclosure: Interactional and intergroup issues". Language and Communication, 8, 109-133.

Duranti, A., & Goodwin, C. ( 1992). Rethinking context. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Foucault, M. ( 1965). Madness and civilization: A history of insanity in the age of reason. New York: Random House.

Foucault, M. ( 1972). The archeology of knowledge. New York: Harper Colophon.

Foucault, M. ( 1977). Discipline and punish. Harmodsworth, Penguin.

Foucault, M. ( 1979). The history of sexuality, Vol. I: An introduction. New York: Random House.

Freccero, J. ( 1986). "Autobiography and narrative". In T. Heller, M. Sosna, & D. Wellbery (Eds.), Reconstructing individualism: Autonomy, individuality and self in western thought. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Freud, S. ( 1914). "Remembering, repeating and working through". Standard Edition, 12, 145-156.

Freud, S. ( 1917). "Mourning and melanchoia". Standard Edition, 14, 237-258.

Gaik, R. ( 1992). "Radio talk-show therapy". In A. Duranti, & C. Goodwin (Eds.), Rethinking context. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Gergen, K. ( 1991). The saturated self: Dilemmas of identity in contemporary life. New York: Basic Books.

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