Childhood Bilingualism: Aspects of Linguistic, Cognitive, and Social Development

By Peter Homel; Michael Palij et al. | Go to book overview

dialectal relationship exists across a creole continuum, or in the aftermath of one. Since American Black English is in all likelihood a decreolized creole, and since at least one controlled study has turned up statistically demonstrated evidence of comprehension problems with Standard English on the part of Black English speaking children (Berdan, 1977) -- and, most important of all, since the success of public education with those who need it most hangs in the balance, the empirical study of the linguistic and psycholinguistic mechanism involved in productive and receptive competence across dialects ought to be an important research agenda.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The material in this paper is in part derived from research supported by a grant (GS-39814X) from the National Science Foundation.


REFERENCES

Berdan, R. ( 1977). Polylectal comprehension and the polylectal grammar. In R. Fasold & R. W. Shuy (Eds.), Studies in language variation. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Bickerton, D. ( 1975). Dynamics of a creole system. Cambridge: University Press.

Bickerton, D. ( 1981). Roots of language. Ann Arbor: Karoma Press.

Bliss, A. ( 1979). Spoken English in Ireland: 1600-1740, Dublin: Dolmen Press.

Committee on CCCC Language Statement. ( 1974). Students' right to their own language. Urbana: National Council of Teachers of English. [ College Composition and Communication: 25 (No. 3) Special issue]

DeCamp, D. ( 1971). Toward a generative analysis of a post-creole speech continuum. In D. Hymes (Ed.), Pidginization and creolization of languages. Cambridge: University Press.

Dillard, J L. ( 1972). Black English in the United States. New York: Random House.

Ervin-Tripp, S. ( 1972). Children's sociolinguistic competence and dialect diversity. Early childhood education: Seventy-first Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, Part 2. Chicago: National Society for the Study of Education.

Fasold, R. ( 1969). Tense and the form be in Black English. Langauge 45,

Fasold, R. ( 1972). Tense marking in Black English. Washington, DC: Center for Applied Linguistics.

Hall, R. A., Jr. ( 1966). Pidgin and creole languages. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Herskovits, M. J. ( 1941). The myth of the negro past. New York: Harper Brothers.

Labov, W. ( 1969). Contraction, deletion, and inherent variability in the English copula. Language, 45.

Labov, W. ( 1972). Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Spears, A. K. ( 1982). The Black English semi-auxiliarycome. Language 58:850-872.

Stewart, W. A. ( 1966). Social dialect. In Research and planning conference on language development in disadvantaged children. New York: Yeshiva University.

Stewart, W. A. ( 1967). Sociolinguistic factors in the history of American Negro dialect. Florida FL Reporter, 5. [Reprinted in H. B. Allen & G. N. Underwood (Eds.), Readings in American dialectology. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1971]

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