The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Translations of the Italian, Latin and Greek Poems from the Columbia University Edition

By David Masson; John Milton | Go to book overview

THE ARGUMENT.

SAMSON, made captive, blind, and now in the prison at Gaza, there to labour as in a common workhouse, on a festival day, in the general cessation from labour, comes forth into the open air, to a place nigh, somewhat retired, there to sit a while and bemoan his condition. Where he happens at length to be visited by certain friends and equals of his tribe, which make the Chorus, who seek to comfort him what they can; then by his old father, Manoa, who endeavours the like, and withal tells him his purpose to procure his liberty by ransom; lastly, that this feast was proclaimed by the Philistines as a day of thanksgiving for their deliverance from the hands of Samson -- which yet more troubles him. Manoa then departs to prosecute his endeavour with the Philistian lords for Samson's redemption: who, in the meanwhile, is visited by other persons, and, lastly, by a public officer to require his coming to the feast before the lords and people, to play or show his strength in their presence. He at first refuses, dismissing the public officer with absolute denial to come; at length, persuaded inwardly that this was from God, he yields to go along with him, who came now the second time with great threatenings to fetch him. The Chorus yet remaining on the place, Manoa returns full of joyful hope to procure ere long his son's deliverance; in the midst of which discourse an Ebrew comes in haste, confusedly at first, and afterwards more distinctly, relating the catastrophe -- what Samson had done to the Philistines, and by accident to himself; wherewith the Tragedy ends.


THE PERSONS.
SAMSON.
MANOA, the father of Samson.Public Officer.
DALILA, his wife.Messenger.
HARAPHA of Gath. Chorus of Danites.
The Scene, before the Prison in Gaza.

-355-

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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Translations of the Italian, Latin and Greek Poems from the Columbia University Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Commendatory Verses, - Prefixed to the Second Edition 37
  • The Verse. 41
  • Paradise Regained. 281
  • Introduction To Paradise Regained. 283
  • Samson Agonistes. 341
  • Introduction To Samson Agonistes. 343
  • Of That Sort of Dramatic Poem Called Tragedy. 353
  • The Argument. 355
  • Samson Agonistes. 357
  • Introduction To the Minor Poems. 395
  • Poems: - English and Latin, With a Few in Italian and Greek. Composed at Several Times. 473
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