Why Was Lincoln Murdered?

By Otto Eisenschiml | Go to book overview

CONTENTS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
NOTES FOR CHAPTER
III THE ELUSIVENESS OF MR. PARKER443
III THE METROPOLITAN POLICE446
IV THE FORBES AFFIDAVIT447
IV THE INACCURACIES OF NICOLAY AND HAY448
V THE STORY TOLD BY DAVID HOMER BATES449
VI THE PLOT TO KIDNAP LINCOLN451
VI THE SPELLING OF THE NAMES OF PAINE AND WIECHMANN452
VIII THE BOGUS PROCLAMATION453
VIII FLOWER AND PITMAN RE-EDIT HISTORY456
IX HOW ATZERODT LEFT WASHINGTON457
X LIEUTENANT DANA SCATTERS THE CHAPEL POINT GARRISON457
XII BOOTH'S PURSUERS458
XIII BOOTH'S DIARY460
XIII STANTON QUOTES460
XIV WHO SHOT THE MAN IN GARRETT'S BARN?461
XV THE MYSTERY OF BOOTH'S NOTE TO JOHNSON462
XIX A PLOT TO KILL LINCOLN ON MARCH 4464
XIX JEFFERSON DAVIS' ATTITUDE TOWARD LINCOLN'S ASSASSINATION465
XX THE LEGALITY OF THE MILITARY COMMISSION466
XX HOLT SHUNS PUBLICITY468
XXI MORE ABOUT DR. MUDD469
XXI A CONFESSION BY ATZERODT469
XXI LIEUTENANT LOVETT'S REPORT471

-441-

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