Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman

By Carter Field | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE

AS THE battle for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1928 developed, Baruch kept the promise he had made himself in 1924, that he would never again help any candidate before the convention. But had events shaped just a little differently he might have been forced to break it. This was because one of the candidates was Senator James A. Reed, of Missouri. Reed had been one of the bitterest critics in the entire country of President Wilson, and Baruch felt very strongly against him. Curiously enough one of Baruch's warm friends, Sam W. Fordyce, of St. Louis, then a law partner of Bennett Champ Clark, was Reed's manager.

The fight was really settled in the California primary, in which all three leading candidates, Alfred E. Smith, Senator Thomas J. Walsh, of Montana, and Reed were entered. Smith won so handsomely, despite heavy newspaper support for Reed by the strong anti-League of Nations newspapers, that the other two did not figure seriously after that.

William G. McAdoo took little part in the campaign that followed Smith's nomination, though he did yield sufficiently to Baruch's advice to make a sizable contribution to the Smith campaign fund. Most of Baruch's old friends in the Democratic Party stuck by Smith. He had never been close to Senator Furnifold M. Simmons, of North Carolina, or Senator Tom Heflin, of Alabama, who bolted. (Both were beaten in their primaries the

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Bernard Baruch, Park Bench Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Chapter One 1
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 21
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 37
  • Chapter Six 45
  • Chapter Seven 54
  • Chapter Eight 63
  • Chapter Nine 70
  • Chapter Ten 79
  • Chapter Eleven 89
  • Chapter Twelve 98
  • Chapter Thirteen 108
  • Chapter Fourteen 117
  • Chapter Fifteen 126
  • Chapter Sixteen 134
  • Chapter Seventeen 145
  • Chapter Eighteen 158
  • Chapter Nineteen 169
  • Chapter Twenty 181
  • Chapter Twenty-One 195
  • Chapter . . . Twenty-Two 207
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 218
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 228
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 238
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 250
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 262
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 272
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 284
  • Chapter Thirty 297
  • Chapter Thirty-One 303
  • Index 311
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