China, the United States, and the Soviet Union: Tripolarity and Policy Making in the Cold War

By Robert S. Ross | Go to book overview

resources--especially the forests, the petroleum, and the minerals-that China's future growth would require, and potentially a major Chinese trading partner. China could offer consumer goods, and its invaluable links to the capital and skills of the Asian Chinese outside the PRC.

Both sides also continued to have major interests in the future of Central Asia, interests which could have easily been the basis of cooperation in the future as they had been the source of competition and conflict in the past. And both sides had a shared interest in peace and stability in Asia, and showed increasing willingness to cooperate with Japan and the U.S. in achieving them. In brief, the decade of the nineties seemed to offer the prospect of a very different Sino-Russian relationship, one that would build on the many gains since 1985 to bring the two most important powers of continental East Asia into a constructive relationship, an essential requirement for a peaceful new order in Asia.


Notes
1.
Harry Gelman, The Soviet Far East Buildup and Soviet Risk-Taking Against China ( Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 1982), p. 8 fn. 11.
2.
Richard F. Staar, ed., Yearbook on International Communist Affairs 1970 ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1971), p. 558.
3.
Ibid., p. 101.
4.
Staar, Yearbook 1970, p. 558.
5.
A helpful background on Chinese relations with the Communist parties of Eastern and Western Europe is provided in Trond Gilberg, "The Impact of the Sino-Soviet Dispute on Eastern Europe" and "The Impact of the Sino-Soviet Dispute on Western Europe" in The Sino-Soviet Conflict: A Global Perspective, ed. Herbert J. Ellison ( Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1982), pp. 268-324.
6.
Richard F. Staar, ed., Yearbook on International Communist Affairs 1974 ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1974), p. 27.
7.
Ibid., p. 433.
8.
Ibid.
9.
Ibid., p. 430.
10.
Foreign Broadcast Information Service-Soviet Union (FBIS/SOV) April 25, 1977.
11.
Richard F. Staar, ed., Yearbook on International Communist Affairs 1978 ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1979) p. 90.
12.
Beijing Review, January 12, 1979, p. 1.
13.
Richard F. Staar, ed., Yearbook on International Communist Affairs 1980 ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1981) p. 85.
14.
Victor Louis, The Coming Decline of the Chinese Empire ( New York: Times Books, 1979). This remarkable book described the restiveness of China's minority peoples and implied a pretext, at least, for a Soviet-backed separation of non-Chinese territory from China.
15.
Beijing Review, May 19, 1980, p. 3.
16.
Richard F. Staar, ed., Yearbook on International Communist Affairs 1981 ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1982), pp. 322-23.
17.
Kommunist, no. 12 ( August, 1980), p. 21.
18.
FBIS, The 27th CPSU Congress: An Agenda for Change ( Washington, D.C., April 11, 1986 [FB 86-10012], p. 63.
19.
Ibid., pp. 63, 68.

-119-

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