The Rape of Poland: Pattern of Soviet Aggression

By Stanislaw Mikolajczyk | Go to book overview

PREFACE

A raging question in Poland has become, "How long will it take them to communize us completely?"

To my mind, however, the question is badly framed. I am convinced that human beings cannot be converted to communism if that conversion is attempted while the country concerned is under Communist rule. Under Communist dictatorship the majority become slaves--but men born in freedom, though they may be coerced, can never be convinced. Communism is an evil which is embraced only by fools and idealists not under the actual heel of such rule.

The question should be phrased: How long can a nation under Communist rule survive the erosion of its soul?

Never before in history has there been such an organized attempt to demoralize men and whole nations as has been made in Communist-dominated countries. People there are forced to lie in order to go on living; to hate instead of to love; to denounce their own patriots and natural leaders and their own ideas. The outside world is deceived by Communist misuse of the organs of true democracy, true patriotism--even, when necessary, true Christianity.

Who rules Poland today, and by what means? The answer is as complex as the nature of communism itself.

The pattern of Communist rule in Poland goes back to 1939, when Molotov and Ribbentrop agreed to partition my country. After stabbing Poland in the back while Hitler was engaging the Polish Army in the west, the Communists established their iron rule in the cast of Poland. This de facto rule was tacitly recognized in the conference rooms of Teheran and Yalta.

Therefore it is important to recognize the real aims of the Communist, his methods, the pattern of Soviet aggression.

By October, 1947, the month in which I began my flight to freedom, the Communists ruled Poland through secret groups, open groups, Security Po

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