Politics, Society and Christianity in Vichy France

By W. D. Halls | Go to book overview

14
Vichy, the Church and the Vatican

Since the beginning of the century the relations between the French State and the papacy had hardly been marked by tolerance or cordiality. After the Separation of Church and State and the passage of the secular laws it was not until 1921 that diplomatic relations with the Vatican were renewed. A conciliatory step was taken when the 'associations cultuelles', set up at parish level to administer Church property, were replaced by 'associations diocésaines', over which the bishop had greater control. However, although the Bloc National Government had been more favourably disposed, the Cartel des Gauches was hostile. Herriot, its Radical leader, adopted a secular policy, and as early as 1924 announced his intention of abolishing the Vatican embassy, because, according to his party, he disliked making 'diplomatic genuflexions', held 'a very lofty conception of secularism... [and] wanted to break the links with a spiritual power that claims to be all-powerful'. 1 The move, however, provoked the Right to anger. Canon Desgranges, the deputy for Morbihan, declared that ten years of peace between Church and State had been shattered. 2 The decision was absurd, because Protestant Britain, then ruled by a Socialist government, nevertheless had its diplomatic representative to the Holy See. 3 Eventually diplomatic relations were fully restored.

In 1939, on the eve of war, the state of relations between Paris and Rome, as we have seen, did show small signs of improvement, but the overall position remained unsatisfactory. It was this situation that the Vichy regime sought to improve still further by cultivating closer diplomatic ties, by abolishing the so-called 'penal laws' that inhibited some forms of religious activity, and by seeking a better working arrangement, if not a Concordat, between the State, the French Church and the Vatican.

The Pope, as the Nuncio in Germany at the time, had approved the Concordat with Hitler, regarding that nation, as he still did in 1939, as the main European bulwark against communism. Only as the war dragged on was his opinion modified. One small indication, however,

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics, Society and Christianity in Vichy France
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 420

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.