Hermeneutics and Human Finitude: Toward a Theory of Ethical Understanding

By P. Christopher Smith | Go to book overview

INDEX
Aeschylus, on pathei mathos (by suffering learned), 175n9, 190, 274
aesthetic consciousness, 189-92, 198-99, 213
agathon, to (adj. agathos) (the good), xiv, 47, 57, 85, 111, 139, 147, 157, 158, 162, 164
ahoristos duas (indeterminate Two), xx, 237-44; SEE to apeiron
aischron, to (adj. aischros) (the ugly, unfair, shameful), xiv, 130, 147, 162, 165-71, 177-78n15, 180, 222, 228, 239, 242, 265n30, 275, 278, 281
aisthesis (perception, comprehension, sensitivity), 57, 71, 74, 86-87; SEE synesis
akolasia (undisciplinedness, licentiousness, intemperance), 239, 242-44, 256
akratia (powerlessness over oneself, incontinence), 82-83, 184, 239
analogy, reasoning by, 48, 56, 58, 82, 140, 216, 237, 264-65n28
anamnisis (being reminded of something, recollection), xxvi, 76, 91, 102n21, 139, 165, 169, 190, 214, 223, 226-27, 276, 281
Anaxagoras, xiii, 142
Anstandigkeit (adj. anstandig) (decency, propriety, appropriateness), 25, 177n15, 180, 200-201, 204-206
apeiron, to (adi. apeiros) (the indefinite, indeterminate, unlimited), 90, 186, 237, 238, 244
apodeixis (demonstration), 56, 58-60, 72, 82, 154-55, 226-27
apophansis (showing forth, displaying), 125-30, 133-34, 137, 152-53, 155-57, 164, 174n7, 222
aporia and euporia (logical impasse and felicitous outcome), 150, 153, 155-56
Aquinas, Thomas, 175n11, 188, 202, 252- 57
aretē (excellence, virtue), xxvii, 10, 24, 57, 58, 98-99n13, 156, WOO; SEE sympasa aretē
Aristotle, xiii, 2, 11, 15-16, 21, 25, 26, 56, 58, 127, 135, 138, 141, 170, 183, 192, 207, 220, 256-57, 258n5, 261n11, 264n27, 264-65n28, 267, 273, 282n1 and Kant, 100n15, 251-52
and Plato, 231-34
on analogy, 216-17
on hexeis,229-30
on justice, 44-52
on philia,29-30, 99-100n14, 154
on phronesis,70-76, 78-84, 101n18, 205, 210, 258n6
on synesis,169, 280-81
Augustine, 60, 66-67, 266n34
Austin, J. L., xvii, xxv, 8, 10, 114, 118, 124, 126, 133, 155, 172n4, 223-25, 262n20
authority, xvi, 67, 197-98, 215, 217, 223, 228, 247, 260n9, 263n26, 265n30, 269
autonomous reasoning, xv-xvi, 19-20, 27, 49-51, 53, 60, 154, 180-86, 197, 204, 212, 215, 216-21, 228, 229, 230, 248, 252, 260n9, 267, 271-72; see external reflection
Bach, Johann Sebastian, xxviiin3
Bedfüfnisbefriedigung, see need satisfaction
Berlin, Isaiah, 15
Bernstein, Richard, xxvii-xviiin2
bouleuesthai (deliberation, taking counsel), 21, 49, 56-58, 62, 80-81, 85, 130, 183, 207, 211, 220, 229, 231, 233, 257n2
Burke, Edmund, xvi, 172n4, 185, 210-11, 216-17, 222, 228, 248, 258n8, 263n26, 267, 274, 280
Civil Society, 14-16, 69, 93, 97-98 n12, 101-102n9, 104n24, 173n6, 177- 78n15, 182, 184, 262n23, 269, 275, 279; see need satisfaction, Rechtszustand
community, xvi, 25, 27, 37, 45-46, 85-87, 93, 95-96n6, 99n13, 102n19, 129, 219, 227, 243, 268, 270, 277, 279; SEE polis, sensus communis
consuetudo (what we are accustomed to do), 188, 253-55; see custom, habitus, hexis

-287-

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Hermeneutics and Human Finitude: Toward a Theory of Ethical Understanding
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxvii
  • 1 - Macintyre and the Disarray of Analytical Moral Philosophy 1
  • Notes 94
  • 2 - Language as the Medium of Understanding) 105
  • Notes 171
  • 3 - The Ethical Implications of Gadamer's Theory of Interpretation 179
  • Notes 257
  • Conclusion: Gadamerian Conservatism 267
  • Note 281
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 287
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