The Mycenaean Age: A Study of the Monuments and Culture of Pre-Homeric Greece

By Chrestos Tsountas; J. Irving Manatt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII RELIGION

WHATEVER view we take of Mycenaean writing it remains the fact that we have not recovered -- at least we have nor read -- any Mycenaean scripture. The soapstone block from the cave-shrine of Zeus may bear a sacred text, but as yet we are without the key. In this total dearth of written data -- of recorded ritual -- it might appear futile to attempt a study of Mycenaean religion. And yet we possess documents, objective or representative, to teach us not a little of the religious faith and practice of the people whose palaces and tombs, whose ways in life and death, are fairly well known to us. These real scriptures are naturally richer in their revelation, of man's future as he conceived it than in aught they have to tell us about the origin of things. Still, a French zoölogist1 has read in Mycenaean vase-painting's the whole theory of evolution by spontaneous generation; he has caught deep-sea protoplasm (in the form of a huge polyp) in the very act of bursting into an eruption of life, -- fish, flesh, and fowl, including even the fretful porcupine.2 Man does not appear on the scene, but he must have been on hand in the person of the painter who (as Perrot puts

A difficult subject in the absence of written data

____________________
1
M. Houssay, known to archaeologists in connection with M. Dieulafoy's expedition to Susiana.
2
His chief document is a stirrup-handled amphora found by Hamdi-Bey in the necropolis of Pitane, near Smyrna; another is a funerary urn from Crete. Both are published by Perrot, Myc. Art., Figs. 480-482.

-294-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mycenaean Age: A Study of the Monuments and Culture of Pre-Homeric Greece
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.