John Paul Jones: Man of Action

By Phillips Russell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIX
The Call from the East

It raised my hair, it fanned my cheek Like a meadow-gale of spring -- It mingled strangely with my fears, Yet it felt like a welcoming.

ONES first delivered dispatches to Adams in London, vainly tried to raise some money through Bancroft, and then hastened to Paris, whence he had recently received no word from the person whose happiness, he wrote, was dearer to him "than anything else." In the course of the previous October he had written from New York to Madame Tellison that he had been "on the rack of fear and apprehension. . . . I have been honoured here beyond my expectations. But your silence makes even honours insipid."

On reaching Paris he sent a messenger to Jefferson with a mysterious note requesting him to call at his hotel, but instructing Jefferson not to ask for him by name but simply for " the gentleman just arrived." He added that he had "several strong reasons for desiring that no person should know of my being here until I have seen you and have been favoured with your advice as to the course I ought to pursue." Jefferson during their interview informed Jones that he had been in communication with M. Simolin, the Russian ambassador at Versailles, who had made known the desire of his sovereign, Catherine II, that Jones should enter her service to fight the Turks in the Black Sea. Jefferson recommended that the Commodore consider the invitation favorably. It appears from the

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