CHAPTER 10
A Candidate for Sure

John Landon once wrote of his son: "He is about the busiest man you ever heard of--telephone is ringing day and night and men from every state in the union [are] coming here to see him." The old gentleman marveled that "one man came in an airship from Los Angeles for no other purpose than just to talk with him. One day the Santa Fe brought in three private cars, all coming to see the Governor." This increasing activity reflected Alf Landon's development as a national figure and his gradual entry in the 1936 presidential sweepstakes. As a result of his reelection in 1934, he was a prominent Republican; by the spring Of 1935, he was an influential Republican; by summer, he was seriously mentioned as a possibility for the nomination; by fall, he had received considerable support and was discussed in the press more often than any of the other possible Republican nominees. In December, Time commented:

Still withholding formal acknowledgment of his candidacy, Governor Landon continued last week to play his role of conscientious public servant modestly awaiting a call to higher service. But... [the] picture services were ready to bet 1,000 to 1 on the Governor's yearnings when they were furnished with a series of photographs depicting Alf M. Landon at six months in long skirts; Alf M. Landon going on 3 years in sailor straw and enormous kilts; Alf M. Landon at 4 in an embroidered collar; Alf M.

-234-

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Landon of Kansas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Chapter 1 Beginnings 3
  • Chapter 2 Getting Down to Business 20
  • Chapter 3 State Chairman 47
  • Chapter 4 Oil and Politics Mix 67
  • Chapter 5 from Oil Rebel to Governor 91
  • Chapter 6 the Governor in Action 118
  • Chapter 7 Affairs of State 150
  • Chapter 8 a Second Term 181
  • Chapter 9 a Long Shot 208
  • Chapter 10 a Candidate for Sure 234
  • Chapter 11 the Early Campaign 262
  • Chapter 12 Full-Time Candidate 291
  • Chapter 13 Sunflowers Do Not Bloom in November 313
  • Chapter 14 from Under the Wreckage 340
  • Chapter 15 Titular Head 353
  • Chapter 16 a Practical Liberal? 381
  • Chapter 17 Days of World Crisis 407
  • Chapter 18 Politics in Time of Peril--1940 423
  • Chapter 19 Road to War 454
  • Chapter 20 Political Opponent in Time of War 480
  • Chapter 21 the Postwar World 513
  • Chapter 22 Ten Years Down on the Farm 542
  • Chapter 23 Elder Statesman 560
  • Bibliographical Note 583
  • Achnowledgments 586
  • Index 589
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