CHAPTER 22
Ten Years Down on the Farm

Landon had been rusticated. After the events of 1948, he found himself out of power in Kansas and out of grace with the national Republican leadership; and consequently came to do what he wanted to do. He no longer felt he must consider the impact of his positions on his party, or that he must travel about the country as a salesman for Republicanism. He could play a private role as the party's conscience, and enjoy himself.

After 1948 the Kansan turned increasingly to his private concerns. He lived a gracious life in his Georgian house, which now, with shrubbery and trees well grown, was splendidly adapted to its site. He spent more time with his charming wife, and gave increased attention to his two teenage children, Nancy and Jack. He rode his horse for an hour or two a day in good weather, and went duck hunting in season. His correspondence was heavy, but most of it was with veterans of the 1936 campaign and old friends, such as Sterling Morton of the Morton Salt Company, publisher Roy W. Howard, newsman Arthur Krock of the New York Times, politician Fred Seaton (who was to become Secretary of the Interior under Eisenhower), and John L. Lewis. He wrote of his opinions on public affairs to his friends--and lifted sentences and paragraphs from their letters for inclusion in his speeches--but his letters increasingly contained comments that were prefaced by "Back in 1936..."

-542-

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Landon of Kansas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Chapter 1 Beginnings 3
  • Chapter 2 Getting Down to Business 20
  • Chapter 3 State Chairman 47
  • Chapter 4 Oil and Politics Mix 67
  • Chapter 5 from Oil Rebel to Governor 91
  • Chapter 6 the Governor in Action 118
  • Chapter 7 Affairs of State 150
  • Chapter 8 a Second Term 181
  • Chapter 9 a Long Shot 208
  • Chapter 10 a Candidate for Sure 234
  • Chapter 11 the Early Campaign 262
  • Chapter 12 Full-Time Candidate 291
  • Chapter 13 Sunflowers Do Not Bloom in November 313
  • Chapter 14 from Under the Wreckage 340
  • Chapter 15 Titular Head 353
  • Chapter 16 a Practical Liberal? 381
  • Chapter 17 Days of World Crisis 407
  • Chapter 18 Politics in Time of Peril--1940 423
  • Chapter 19 Road to War 454
  • Chapter 20 Political Opponent in Time of War 480
  • Chapter 21 the Postwar World 513
  • Chapter 22 Ten Years Down on the Farm 542
  • Chapter 23 Elder Statesman 560
  • Bibliographical Note 583
  • Achnowledgments 586
  • Index 589
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