A Year of Revolutions: Fanny Lewald's Recollections of 1848

By Hanna Ballin Lewis; Fanny Lewald | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

BERLIN IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER 1848

Berlin, November 8, 1848

Yesterday I returned home after a four-month absence. I have already seen a number of our acquaintances today, who are all very worried about the possibility of a coup d'état, although they consider such an action justified because of the National Assembly's lack of moderation or call it an injustice by the government, an act of wanton recklessness. Every one agrees that a coup would be disaster for the country. The mood of the people seems even more depressed to me now than last March and the bitterness of the parties seems still harsher. The hatred of the stable friends of order has taken on a ill-concealed character, that now, grinding its teeth, offers only forceful means. They long for a blood bath, in which Basserman's frightening apparitions 1 would drown. They have obviously adopted the latest arguments of the king as their own. The majority probably heartily regrets that this verdict by shrapnel is still the "most enviable privilege" of the crown and that each one of them can not make use of his own private little cannons against the persons and the opinions most

____________________
1
Friedrich Daniel Bassermann ( 1811-1855), German liberal politician, who supported the Lesser Germany Plan at the Frankfurt Parliament. In a speech on November 11, he spoke of conditions in Berlin, the suspicious characters inhabiting the streets and various anarchist groups that were preventing cooperation between Frankfurt and Berlin. These people were thereafter referred to as Bassermann's "frightening apparitions."

-141-

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A Year of Revolutions: Fanny Lewald's Recollections of 1848
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - J Ourney from Oldenburg to Paris 23
  • Chapter 2 - March in the French Republic 40
  • Chapter 3 - Berlin, Spring 1848 88
  • Chapter 4 - Hamburg, July and August, 1848 118
  • Chapter 5 - Frankfurt Am Main, October 1848 121
  • Chapter 6 - Berlin in November and December 1848 141
  • Select Bibliography 156
  • Index 161
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