Studies in the Bible and Jewish Thought

By Moshe Greenberg | Go to book overview

On the Refinement of the Conception of Prayer in Hebrew Scriptures
1976

Prophetic intercessory prayer was vividly described some years ago by Yochanan Muffs in an essay that collected and interrelated the wrestlings with God that characterize prophetic prayer from Moses through Samuel to Jeremiah. Earlier, Sheldon Blank studied "the Promethean element in biblical prayer," an allusion to the independent, even defiant stance taken by certain biblical pray-ers.1 To modern Western man, this sort of prayer best corresponds to his ideal image of himself: autonomous, self-assertive, courageous, ready to stand on a principle even against God. However, it would be a mistake to forget the special status of such intercessors within their faithcommunities and infer from their conduct a model for the common man. They are "men of God," persons standing in a particularly intimate relation to God as a result of election or prolonged devotion to him. Of Honi the circle-maker -- a later representative of this class -- it was censoriously said that he was like a child who cajoles his father. Any other man presuming to act that way, the same censor concluded, would deserve excommunication.2

We have only to recall Moses' exploitation of his special status with God in his great intercession after the episode of the golden calf: "You have said, 'I have singled you out by name, and you have, indeed, gained my favor:' Now, if I have truly gained your favor, pray let me know your ways..." ( Exod. 33:12f.); and again, "If I have gained your favor, O LORD, pray let the LORD go in our midst..." (34:9). These heroes of faith have achieved a standing with God that ordinary mortals do not enjoy. They bank on their closeness to God and their con

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in the Bible and Jewish Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 462

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.