The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson

By Joanna Richardson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
WHITE FLOWERS AND BLAMELESS LIVES

IN the spring of 1858, on a walking tour of the Isle of Wight, John Tyndall, the physicist, found himself at the hotel in Freshwater Bay. By accident, some of his letters were delivered at Farringford. The result was an invitation to dine; and on April 6th Tyndall found himself facing the Laureate and Jowett, 'a man with a youthful countenance,' wrote Tyndall, 'but whose hair is quite gray ... I should not infer much force of character from his countenance.' Tyndall himself was both young and strong in character: at thirty-eight, he was already a colleague of Faraday's and Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution; and a holiday with Huxley in Switzerland had already suggested the basis of his classic work, The Glaciers of the Alps, in which he would explain the nature of glacier motion. He was a man after Tennyson's heart: not only a scientist, but a mountaineer (he would make the first ascent of the Weisshorn in 1861) and, as his accounts of his Alpine expeditions would show, poetically appreciative. He and Tennyson talked, now, 'of the moon and its changing size as it approached the horizon, of atmospheric colouring', and of Tyndall's journey up Mont Blanc. Then scientist and poet went up to the holy of holies:

There was a desk, a table on which was a large volume with brightly gilt edges, a sofa, some chairs, an apparatus on the chimney-piece like a test-tube stand, in which fifteen or twenty pipes were stuck. The drawers of the table were full of tobacco of various kinds. Tennyson filled his pipe, filled a pipe for me, lit it himself, and then transferred it to my lips. We puffed socially side by side, and continued to talk of Maud. He said the oftener he read the poem the more he was convinced of its merits. It was one of the best things he had ever done. Jowett joined us for a time, and we talked of

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.