The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson

By Joanna Richardson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX
LORD TENNYSON

THE early months of 1883 passed quietly at Farringford, though Tennyson made a new friend in Mary Boyle, the novelist, who came to stay at a near-by cottage, The Briary, in the spring. Soon afterwards, he went to stay at the deanery at Westminster, where Granville Bradley had succeeded Stanley as dean. Archdeacon Farrar asked him to write an epitaph for Caxton for the window in St Margaret's, which the printers of London had set there to his memory; and Gladstone called, and they talked like friends, though Tennyson bitterly opposed his Irish policy, and Gladstone, reported Hallam, 'told us that he felt irritated, having been badgered to death by Irish obstruction'. Tennyson went to Much Ado About Nothing, at the Lyceum, where he thought Irving diligent, though less inspired than he had been as Richard III; he again discussed Becket with him, and Irving began yet again to consider it for the stage. Next morning, Tennyson and Hallam wandered for a long while about Westminster Abbey, and climbed up to the chantry as the choir was singing. 'It is beautiful,' said the Laureate, suddenly, 'but what empty and awful mockery if there were no God!'

In March he was moved by the Queen's distress at the death of her personal servant, John Brown. He wrote her a letter of condolence, and she asked him about an inscription for the memorial that she wanted to raise to Brown at Balmoral; to Tennyson's fury, news of this somehow leaked into the Press, and The Weekly Despatch organized a competition for parodies of the expected poem. Soon afterwards the Queen was seriously injured by a fall. On August 2nd a message came in her usual blunt, touching style: 'The Queen is very anxious for Mr Tennyson to come to Osborne for the day from Aldworth if this will not be too much for him. The Queen has been very much pleased with Mr Tennyson's letters to her after her accident and the loss of her old servant and she has been reading In Memoriam again, which

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.