The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson

By Joanna Richardson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE
'THE VERY JOY OF MY HEART'

IN June 1890, when Watts had left Farringford, Emily reported that Alfred was going to London to see his doctor, Sir Andrew Clark, and an aurist. 'Mr Knowles wanted him to go tomorrow and meet Princess Mary [of Teck] and her husband & daughter,' she told Mrs Weld on June 30th. 'But much as he likes the Princess he does not feel equal to going there as there is sure to be a host of people to meet her and now he shrinks from a multitude. Nurse will go to the Nurses' Home and attend to him there.' 'You will be glad to hear that Sir Andrew, the Aurist and the Oculist all pronounced favourably on him,' she reported on July 7th. 'I do not myself believe that he is so well as is said tho' wonderful considering what he has gone thro'. The Knowles were most kind and hospitable. The Gladstones and others dined there one night, Mr Gladstone being anxious to see my Ally who however did not dine downstairs but Mr Gladstone went up and brought him down after dinner and was very delightful.'

After the Laureate's public outburst in The Times, after his repeated attacks on Gladstone's policy, there was some need for reconciliation; but Gladstone had 'real respect and admiration for Tennyson, both as poet and man'; and Tennyson's detestation of Gladstone's politics could not finally break the friendship of fifty years with the vigorous, sincere and enthusiastic friend of Arthur Hallam. That night, at Knowles's suggestion, the Prime Minister had gone upstairs after dinner to persuade the Laureate to come down. Gladstone's quickness of understanding was magical. Ten minutes later, the two men entered the room arm in arm, and 'sat down side by side on the sofa, talking eagerly about the Greek gods and other kindred subjects'. At the end of the evening Tennyson apologized to Knowles for his harsh comments on the Prime Minister.

Next morning, at breakfast, he was uncommonly taciturn, even for him. At last, putting down his knife and fork with a clatter,

-254-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pre-Eminent Victorian: A Study of Tennyson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.