Washington and His Generals - Vol. 1

By Joel Tyler Headley | Go to book overview

himself assiduously and with eminent success to his profession, and in 1785 was a second time returned to Congress, where his activity, earnestness and eloquence secured to him much influence. When General St. Clair was appointed governor of the North-west Territory, General Varnum was selected to be one of the judges of its supreme court, and in June, 1788, he removed to Marietta, to enter upon the duties of his new office. His health had been for several years declining, and on the 17th of January, 1789, he died.

The career of General Varnum was brief and brilliant. He was but thirty-one years of age when he retired from the army, and but forty at his death. He was reputed to be a good officer, but had little opportunity to acquire military distinction. His forensic abilities however were of a high order, and the fulness of his knowledge, his quick apprehension, and the grace and power of his oratory, inspired the brightest hopes of his civic career.


BRIGADIER-GENERAL WILLIAM WOODFORD.

WILLIAM WOODFORD was born in Caroline county, Virginia, in 1734. He distinguished himself in the French and Indian war, and when the Virginia convention, on the 17th of July, 1775, passed an ordinance for raising two regiments to act in defence of the colony, Patrick Henry was appointed colonel of the first, and he of the second. In the military operations which followed, in the vicinity of Williamsburg, he displayed ability and courage, particularly in the battle of Great Bridge, fought on the 9th of December, upon which occasion he had the

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Washington and His Generals - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.